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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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A cross-cultural convergent parallel mixed methods study of what makes a cancer-related symptom or functional health problem clinically important

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  1. Use of antidepressants in women after prophylactic bilateral oophorectomy: A Danish national cohort study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Sexual and romantic challenges among young Danes diagnosed with cancer: Results from a cross-sectional nationwide questionnaire study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Body image mediates the effect of cancer-related stigmatization on depression: A new target for intervention

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • Johannes M Giesinger
  • Neil K Aaronson
  • Juan I Arraras
  • Fabio Efficace
  • Mogens Groenvold
  • Jacobien M Kieffer
  • Fanny L Loth
  • Morten Aa Petersen
  • John Ramage
  • Krzysztof A Tomaszewski
  • Teresa Young
  • Bernhard Holzner
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OBJECTIVE: In this study, we investigated what makes a symptom or functional impairment clinically important, that is, relevant for a patient to discuss with a health care professional (HCP). This is the first part of a European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Group project focusing on the development of thresholds for clinical importance for the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire and its corresponding computer-adaptive version.

METHODS: We conducted interviews with cancer patients and HCPs in 6 European countries. Participants were asked to name aspects of a symptom or problem that make it clinically important and to provide importance ratings for a predefined set of aspects (eg, need for help and limitations of daily functioning).

RESULTS: We conducted interviews with 83 cancer patients (mean age, 60.3 y; 50.6% men) and 67 HCPs. Participants related clinical importance to limitations of everyday life (patients, 65.1%; HCPs, 77.6%), the emotional impact of a symptom/problem (patients, 53.0%; HCPs, 64.2%), and duration/frequency (patients, 51.8%; HCPs, 49.3%). In the patient sample, importance ratings were highest for worries by partner or family, limitations in everyday life, and need for help from the medical staff. Health care professionals rated limitations in everyday life and need for help from the medical staff to be most important.

CONCLUSIONS: Limitations in everyday life, need for (medical) help, and emotional impact on the patient or family/partner were found to be relevant aspects of clinical importance. Based on these findings, we will define anchor items for the development of thresholds for clinical importance for the EORTC measures in a Europe-wide field study.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPsycho-Oncology
Volume27
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)548-555
Number of pages8
ISSN1057-9249
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2018

ID: 56397041