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Well-Being and Self-Disorders in Schizotypal Disorder and Asperger Syndrome/Autism Spectrum Disorder

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Nilsson, Maria ; Handest, Peter ; Carlsson, Jessica ; Nylander, Lena ; Pedersen, Lennart ; Mortensen, Erik Lykke ; Arnfred, Sidse. / Well-Being and Self-Disorders in Schizotypal Disorder and Asperger Syndrome/Autism Spectrum Disorder. I: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. 2020 ; Bind 0, Nr. 0.

Bibtex

@article{adf88eed0c8f4b10bacde7c9a02510cf,
title = "Well-Being and Self-Disorders in Schizotypal Disorder and Asperger Syndrome/Autism Spectrum Disorder",
abstract = "We explored subjective well-being in two groups of young adult participantsdiagnosed with either schizotypal disorder (Sd) (n = 29) or Asperger syndrome/autism spectrum disorder (As/ASD) (n = 22). Well-being was impairedin both groups and was lower in the Sd group than in the As/ASD group.Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between well-being and the presence of self-disorders. The negative effect of self-disorders on well-beingwas still significant when adjusted for diagnosis, age and gender, and level of function. The present findings point toward clinically important disorder-specific differences in the nature of impaired well-being between the Sd group and the As/ASD group, as there seems to be a self-disorder–driven additional contribution to impaired subjectivewell-being within the schizophrenia spectrum. These findings further nuance the understanding of fundamental and clinically important qualitative differences between the schizophrenia spectrum and the autism spectrum.",
author = "Maria Nilsson and Peter Handest and Jessica Carlsson and Lena Nylander and Lennart Pedersen and Mortensen, {Erik Lykke} and Sidse Arnfred",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1097",
language = "English",
volume = "0",
journal = "Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease",
issn = "0022-3018",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins",
number = "0",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Well-Being and Self-Disorders in Schizotypal Disorder and Asperger Syndrome/Autism Spectrum Disorder

AU - Nilsson, Maria

AU - Handest, Peter

AU - Carlsson, Jessica

AU - Nylander, Lena

AU - Pedersen, Lennart

AU - Mortensen, Erik Lykke

AU - Arnfred, Sidse

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - We explored subjective well-being in two groups of young adult participantsdiagnosed with either schizotypal disorder (Sd) (n = 29) or Asperger syndrome/autism spectrum disorder (As/ASD) (n = 22). Well-being was impairedin both groups and was lower in the Sd group than in the As/ASD group.Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between well-being and the presence of self-disorders. The negative effect of self-disorders on well-beingwas still significant when adjusted for diagnosis, age and gender, and level of function. The present findings point toward clinically important disorder-specific differences in the nature of impaired well-being between the Sd group and the As/ASD group, as there seems to be a self-disorder–driven additional contribution to impaired subjectivewell-being within the schizophrenia spectrum. These findings further nuance the understanding of fundamental and clinically important qualitative differences between the schizophrenia spectrum and the autism spectrum.

AB - We explored subjective well-being in two groups of young adult participantsdiagnosed with either schizotypal disorder (Sd) (n = 29) or Asperger syndrome/autism spectrum disorder (As/ASD) (n = 22). Well-being was impairedin both groups and was lower in the Sd group than in the As/ASD group.Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between well-being and the presence of self-disorders. The negative effect of self-disorders on well-beingwas still significant when adjusted for diagnosis, age and gender, and level of function. The present findings point toward clinically important disorder-specific differences in the nature of impaired well-being between the Sd group and the As/ASD group, as there seems to be a self-disorder–driven additional contribution to impaired subjectivewell-being within the schizophrenia spectrum. These findings further nuance the understanding of fundamental and clinically important qualitative differences between the schizophrenia spectrum and the autism spectrum.

U2 - 10.1097

DO - 10.1097

M3 - Journal article

VL - 0

JO - Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease

JF - Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease

SN - 0022-3018

IS - 0

ER -

ID: 59474795