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Weight gain in adults with avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder compared to restrictive anorexia nervosa—pilot findings from a longitudinal study

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DOI

  1. Explanatory Factors for Disease-Specific Health-Related Quality of Life in Women with Anorexia Nervosa

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Cognitive function in adults with enduring anorexia nervosa

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Background: Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) is characterized by persistent failure to meet nutritional needs, absence of body image distortion and often low body weight. Weight restorative treatment in ARFID-adults is provided for as in Anorexia Nervosa (AN), while the effect is unknown. The aim was to compare weight gain between ARFID and restrictive subtype of AN (AN-R), including exploring impact of medical factors and psychopathology. Methods: Individuals with ARFID (n = 7; all cases enrolled over 5 years) and AN-R (n = 80) were recruited from the Prospective Longitudinal All-comers inclusion study in Eating Disorders (PROLED) during 5 years. All underwent weight restorative inpatient treatment. Clinical characteristics at baseline and weekly weight gain were recorded and compared. Results: There were no significant differences at baseline weight, nor in weight gain between groups. Anxiety was statistically significantly higher in AN-R at baseline. Conclusions: Although there were differences in several clinical measures at baseline (Autism Quotient, symptom checklist, mood scores and Morgan Russel Outcome Scale), only anxiety was higher in AN-R. No differences in weight gain were observed, although mean values indicate a faster weight gain in the ARFID group. Standard weight restorative treatment in this study in adults with ARFID has similar weight gaining effect as in AN-R.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer871
TidsskriftNutrients
Vol/bind13
Udgave nummer3
Sider (fra-til)1-9
Antal sider9
ISSN2072-6643
DOI
StatusUdgivet - mar. 2021

Bibliografisk note

Funding Information:
Funding: We are grateful for the funding support from the following external funds: Axel Muusfeldts Fond, the Dagmar Marshalls Fond, the Direktør Emil C. Hert og Hustru Inger Hertz Fond, the Jascha Fonden. In addition, we are grateful for the internal support from the Psychiatric Center Ballerup and the Psychiatry section of the Capitol Region of Denmark.

Funding Information:
We are grateful for the funding support from the following external funds: Axel Muusfeldts Fond, the Dagmar Marshalls Fond, the Direkt?r Emil C. Hert og Hustru Inger Hertz Fond, the Jascha Fonden. In addition, we are grateful for the internal support from the Psychiatric Center Ballerup and the Psychiatry section of the Capitol Region of Denmark. The authors are thankful to the Psychiatric Center Ballerup, especially Depart-ments 3, 14, and the Daycare unit for their support. In addition, we are grateful for the support of the Capitol Region of Denmark, section Psychiatry for the PROLED study.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Copyright:
Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

ID: 65656959