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Vitamin D levels and Cancer Incidence in 217.244 individuals from Primary Health Care in Denmark

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@article{763c7522e18f4e52855686d45f3e0df9,
title = "Vitamin D levels and Cancer Incidence in 217.244 individuals from Primary Health Care in Denmark",
abstract = "Vitamin D has been linked to cancer development in both pre-clinical and epidemiological studies. Our study examines the association between serum levels of vitamin D and cancer incidence in the Capital Region of Denmark. Individuals who had vitamin D analyzed at The Copenhagen General Practitioners Laboratory between April 2004 and January 2010 were linked to Danish registries with end of follow-up date at Dec 31st 2014, excluding individuals with pre-existing cancer. Cox regression models adjusted for age in one-year intervals, sex, month of sampling, and Charlson Comorbidity Index were applied. The study population of 217,244 individuals had a median vitamin D level of 46 nmol/L (IQR 27–67 nmol/L). Non-melanoma skin cancer was the most frequent form of cancer, followed by breast-, lung-, and prostate cancers. No associations were found between increments of 10 nmol/L vitamin D and incidence of breast, colorectal, urinary, ovary or corpus uteri cancer. However, higher levels of vitamin D were associated with higher incidence of non-melanoma (HR 1.09 [1.09–1.1]) and melanoma skin cancer (HR 1.1 [1.08–1.13]) as well as prostate (HR 1.05 [1.03–1.07]) and hematological cancers (HR 1.03 [1.01–1.06]), but with lower incidence of lung cancer (HR 0.95 [0.93–0.97]). In our study, vitamin D levels are not associated with the incidence of several major cancer types, but higher levels are significantly associated with a higher incidence of skin, prostate, and hematological cancers as well as a lower incidence of lung cancer. These results do not support an overall protective effect against cancer by vitamin D.",
keywords = "cancer incidence, primary health care, vitamin D levels",
author = "Vojdeman, {Fie Juhl} and Madsen, {Christian Medom} and Kirsten Frederiksen and Darshana Durup and Anja Olsen and Louise Hansen and Anne-Marie Heegaard and Bent Lind and Anne Tj{\o}nneland and J{\o}rgensen, {Henrik L{\o}vendahl} and Peter Schwarz",
note = "{\circledC} 2019 UICC.",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1002/ijc.32105",
language = "English",
journal = "International Journal of Cancer",
issn = "0020-7136",
publisher = "JohnWiley & Sons, Inc",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vitamin D levels and Cancer Incidence in 217.244 individuals from Primary Health Care in Denmark

AU - Vojdeman, Fie Juhl

AU - Madsen, Christian Medom

AU - Frederiksen, Kirsten

AU - Durup, Darshana

AU - Olsen, Anja

AU - Hansen, Louise

AU - Heegaard, Anne-Marie

AU - Lind, Bent

AU - Tjønneland, Anne

AU - Jørgensen, Henrik Løvendahl

AU - Schwarz, Peter

N1 - © 2019 UICC.

PY - 2019/1/7

Y1 - 2019/1/7

N2 - Vitamin D has been linked to cancer development in both pre-clinical and epidemiological studies. Our study examines the association between serum levels of vitamin D and cancer incidence in the Capital Region of Denmark. Individuals who had vitamin D analyzed at The Copenhagen General Practitioners Laboratory between April 2004 and January 2010 were linked to Danish registries with end of follow-up date at Dec 31st 2014, excluding individuals with pre-existing cancer. Cox regression models adjusted for age in one-year intervals, sex, month of sampling, and Charlson Comorbidity Index were applied. The study population of 217,244 individuals had a median vitamin D level of 46 nmol/L (IQR 27–67 nmol/L). Non-melanoma skin cancer was the most frequent form of cancer, followed by breast-, lung-, and prostate cancers. No associations were found between increments of 10 nmol/L vitamin D and incidence of breast, colorectal, urinary, ovary or corpus uteri cancer. However, higher levels of vitamin D were associated with higher incidence of non-melanoma (HR 1.09 [1.09–1.1]) and melanoma skin cancer (HR 1.1 [1.08–1.13]) as well as prostate (HR 1.05 [1.03–1.07]) and hematological cancers (HR 1.03 [1.01–1.06]), but with lower incidence of lung cancer (HR 0.95 [0.93–0.97]). In our study, vitamin D levels are not associated with the incidence of several major cancer types, but higher levels are significantly associated with a higher incidence of skin, prostate, and hematological cancers as well as a lower incidence of lung cancer. These results do not support an overall protective effect against cancer by vitamin D.

AB - Vitamin D has been linked to cancer development in both pre-clinical and epidemiological studies. Our study examines the association between serum levels of vitamin D and cancer incidence in the Capital Region of Denmark. Individuals who had vitamin D analyzed at The Copenhagen General Practitioners Laboratory between April 2004 and January 2010 were linked to Danish registries with end of follow-up date at Dec 31st 2014, excluding individuals with pre-existing cancer. Cox regression models adjusted for age in one-year intervals, sex, month of sampling, and Charlson Comorbidity Index were applied. The study population of 217,244 individuals had a median vitamin D level of 46 nmol/L (IQR 27–67 nmol/L). Non-melanoma skin cancer was the most frequent form of cancer, followed by breast-, lung-, and prostate cancers. No associations were found between increments of 10 nmol/L vitamin D and incidence of breast, colorectal, urinary, ovary or corpus uteri cancer. However, higher levels of vitamin D were associated with higher incidence of non-melanoma (HR 1.09 [1.09–1.1]) and melanoma skin cancer (HR 1.1 [1.08–1.13]) as well as prostate (HR 1.05 [1.03–1.07]) and hematological cancers (HR 1.03 [1.01–1.06]), but with lower incidence of lung cancer (HR 0.95 [0.93–0.97]). In our study, vitamin D levels are not associated with the incidence of several major cancer types, but higher levels are significantly associated with a higher incidence of skin, prostate, and hematological cancers as well as a lower incidence of lung cancer. These results do not support an overall protective effect against cancer by vitamin D.

KW - cancer incidence

KW - primary health care

KW - vitamin D levels

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85060326103&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/ijc.32105

DO - 10.1002/ijc.32105

M3 - Journal article

JO - International Journal of Cancer

JF - International Journal of Cancer

SN - 0020-7136

ER -

ID: 56118237