Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Vaginal seeding or vaginal microbial transfer from the mother to the cesarean born neonate: a commentary regarding clinical management

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Native tissue repair is cost-effective in primary anterior POP

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Defining definitions: a Delphi study to develop a core outcome set for conditions of severe maternal morbidity

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Prenatal dietary supplements influence the infant airway microbiota in a randomized factorial clinical trial

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Virulent coliphages in 1-year-old children fecal samples are fewer, but more infectious than temperate coliphages

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Vaginal fødsel af tvillinger

    Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportBidrag til bog/antologiUndervisningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer

Recent evidence suggests cesarean delivery (CD) to be a risk factor for inflammatory and metabolic diseases such as asthma, allergies and other chronic immune disorders in the child. One hypothetical pathogenesis of these associations has been proposed to be a disruption of the neonatal colonization (NC) after CD. To further support this hypothesis, it has been observed that the effect of CD on NC was different according to type of CD, i.e. planned or emergency, and that the risk of asthma in children born by CD was mitigated by rupture of membranes, though still increased compared to children delivered vaginally. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftBJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology
Vol/bind125
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)533-536
ISSN1470-0328
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2018

ID: 50611917