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Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
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Use-Dependent Plasticity in Human Primary Motor Hand Area: Synergistic Interplay Between Training and Immobilization

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Vis graf over relationer

Training and immobilization are powerful drivers of use-dependent plasticity in human primary motor hand area (M1HAND). In young right-handed volunteers, corticomotor representations of the left first dorsal interosseus and abductor digiti minimi muscles were mapped with neuronavigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to elucidate how finger-specific training and immobilization interact within M1HAND. A first group of volunteers trained to track a moving target on a smartphone with the left index or little finger for one week. Linear sulcus shape-informed TMS mapping revealed that the tracking skill acquired with the trained finger was transferred to the nontrained finger of the same hand. The cortical representations of the trained and nontrained finger muscle converged in proportion with skill transfer. In a second group, the index or little finger were immobilized for one week. Immobilization alone attenuated the corticomotor representation and pre-existing tracking skill of the immobilized finger. In a third group, the detrimental effects of finger immobilization were blocked by concurrent training of the nonimmobilized finger. Conversely, immobilization of the nontrained fingers accelerated learning in the adjacent trained finger during the first 2 days of training. Together, the results provide novel insight into use-dependent cortical plasticity, revealing synergistic rather than competitive interaction patterns within M1HAND.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftCerebral Cortex
Vol/bind29
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)356-371
Antal sider16
ISSN1047-3211
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1 jan. 2019

ID: 55528404