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Use of beta-blockers and risk of contralateral breast cancer

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Vis graf over relationer

Beta-blockers have shown antineoplastic effects in laboratory studies but epidemiologic evidence in relation to contralateral breast cancer (CBC) is sparse. We investigated postdiagnosis beta-blocker use and risk of CBC in a cohort of 52 723 women with breast cancer by using nationwide Danish health registers and the Danish Breast Cancer Group database. We defined postdiagnosis beta-blocker use as a time-varying covariate starting 1 year after a second prescription was redeemed. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for CBC associated with beta-blocker use compared to nonuse. We identified 1444 women with CBC of whom 209 women were beta-blocker users. We found an overall HR of 1.08 (95% CI: 0.93-1.27) for beta-blocker use and risk of CBC with no substantial variation according to cumulative amount, intensity or selectivity of beta-blocker use. Hence, our cohort study of women with breast cancer did not sustain a protective effect of beta-blocker use on risk of CBC, irrespective of beta-blocker type.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftInternational Journal of Cancer
Vol/bind150
Udgave nummer10
Sider (fra-til)1619-1626
Antal sider8
ISSN0020-7136
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 15 maj 2022

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