Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Update on Simulation-Based Surgical Training and Assessment in Ophthalmology: A Systematic Review

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Peripapillary Ovoid Hyperreflectivity in Optic Disc Edema and Pseudopapilledema

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Adrenal Suppression in Infants Treated with Topical Ocular Glucocorticoids

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Long-Term Metastatic Risk after Biopsy of Posterior Uveal Melanoma

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Myopic Choroidal Neovascularization: Review, Guidance, and Consensus Statement on Management

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

  5. Operating Room Performance Improves after Proficiency-Based Virtual Reality Cataract Surgery Training

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Whole genome landscapes of uveal melanoma show an ultraviolet radiation signature in iris tumours

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Loss of retinal tension and permanent decrease in retinal function: a new porcine model of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Point-of-care ultrasound for general practitioners: a systematic needs assessment

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer

TOPIC: This study reviews the evidence behind simulation-based surgical training of ophthalmologists to determine (1) the validity of the reported models and (2) the ability to transfer skills to the operating room.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Simulation-based training is established widely within ophthalmology, although it often lacks a scientific basis for implementation.

METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of trials involving simulation-based training or assessment of ophthalmic surgical skills among health professionals. The search included 5 databases (PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science) and was completed on March 1, 2014. Overall, the included trials were divided into animal, cadaver, inanimate, and virtual-reality models. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool. Validity evidence was evaluated using a modern validity framework (Messick's).

RESULTS: We screened 1368 reports for eligibility and included 118 trials. The most common surgery simulated was cataract surgery. Most validity trials investigated only 1 or 2 of 5 sources of validity (87%). Only 2 trials (48 participants) investigated transfer of skills to the operating room; 4 trials (65 participants) evaluated the effect of simulation-based training on patient-related outcomes. Because of heterogeneity of the studies, it was not possible to conduct a quantitative analysis.

CONCLUSIONS: The methodologic rigor of trials investigating simulation-based surgical training in ophthalmology is inadequate. To ensure effective implementation of training models, evidence-based knowledge of validity and efficacy is needed. We provide a useful tool for implementation and evaluation of research in simulation-based training.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftOphthalmology
Vol/bind122
Udgave nummer6
Sider (fra-til)1111-1130
ISSN0161-6420
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 10 apr. 2015

ID: 45281626