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Trends in the use of patient-reported outcome measures for inguinal hernia repair: a quantitative systematic review

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@article{541700fbb185434d95db6b4ef99370fe,
title = "Trends in the use of patient-reported outcome measures for inguinal hernia repair: a quantitative systematic review",
abstract = "Purpose: To quantitatively assess the use of patient-reported outcome measures in studies involving patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair. Methods: We performed a systematic literature search in Medline and EMBASE. We included all studies published between 2000 and 2019 that involved > 5 patients receiving inguinal hernia repair and evaluated a postoperative patient-reported outcome measure. Studies were stratified in 5-year intervals. We extracted data on which patient-reported outcome measure was used, its time of administration, study design, and the size and composition of the study population. Data were presented using descriptive statistics. Results: We included 929 studies that covered 81 different patient-reported outcome measures. Of these, the Short-Form 36 was the most commonly used generic instrument (14%), the Carolinas Comfort Scale was the most commonly used hernia-specific instrument (5%), and the Visual Analogue Scale was the most commonly used domain-specific instrument (70%). There was a proportional decrease in the use of generic instruments, from 24% of studies in 2000–2004 to only 14% of studies in 2015–2019. Conversely, there was an increase in the use of hernia-specific instruments, from 0% in 2000–2004 to 18% in 2015–2019. Conclusions: There is heterogeneity in the use of patient-reported outcome measures in the field of inguinal hernia research. The use of hernia-specific instruments is increasing, the use of generic instruments is decreasing, and the use of domain-specific instruments remains consistently high. This study serves as a repository of all available patient-reported outcome measures relevant to patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair.",
keywords = "Inguinal hernia, Outcome assessment, Patient-reported outcome, PROM, Questionnaire",
author = "A. Gram-Hanssen and Jessen, {M. L.} and C. Christophersen and D. Zetner and J. Rosenberg",
note = "Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2020, Springer-Verlag France SAS, part of Springer Nature.",
year = "2021",
month = oct,
doi = "10.1007/s10029-020-02322-3",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "1111--1120",
journal = "Hernia",
issn = "1265-4906",
publisher = "Springer France",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Trends in the use of patient-reported outcome measures for inguinal hernia repair

T2 - a quantitative systematic review

AU - Gram-Hanssen, A.

AU - Jessen, M. L.

AU - Christophersen, C.

AU - Zetner, D.

AU - Rosenberg, J.

N1 - Publisher Copyright: © 2020, Springer-Verlag France SAS, part of Springer Nature.

PY - 2021/10

Y1 - 2021/10

N2 - Purpose: To quantitatively assess the use of patient-reported outcome measures in studies involving patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair. Methods: We performed a systematic literature search in Medline and EMBASE. We included all studies published between 2000 and 2019 that involved > 5 patients receiving inguinal hernia repair and evaluated a postoperative patient-reported outcome measure. Studies were stratified in 5-year intervals. We extracted data on which patient-reported outcome measure was used, its time of administration, study design, and the size and composition of the study population. Data were presented using descriptive statistics. Results: We included 929 studies that covered 81 different patient-reported outcome measures. Of these, the Short-Form 36 was the most commonly used generic instrument (14%), the Carolinas Comfort Scale was the most commonly used hernia-specific instrument (5%), and the Visual Analogue Scale was the most commonly used domain-specific instrument (70%). There was a proportional decrease in the use of generic instruments, from 24% of studies in 2000–2004 to only 14% of studies in 2015–2019. Conversely, there was an increase in the use of hernia-specific instruments, from 0% in 2000–2004 to 18% in 2015–2019. Conclusions: There is heterogeneity in the use of patient-reported outcome measures in the field of inguinal hernia research. The use of hernia-specific instruments is increasing, the use of generic instruments is decreasing, and the use of domain-specific instruments remains consistently high. This study serves as a repository of all available patient-reported outcome measures relevant to patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair.

AB - Purpose: To quantitatively assess the use of patient-reported outcome measures in studies involving patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair. Methods: We performed a systematic literature search in Medline and EMBASE. We included all studies published between 2000 and 2019 that involved > 5 patients receiving inguinal hernia repair and evaluated a postoperative patient-reported outcome measure. Studies were stratified in 5-year intervals. We extracted data on which patient-reported outcome measure was used, its time of administration, study design, and the size and composition of the study population. Data were presented using descriptive statistics. Results: We included 929 studies that covered 81 different patient-reported outcome measures. Of these, the Short-Form 36 was the most commonly used generic instrument (14%), the Carolinas Comfort Scale was the most commonly used hernia-specific instrument (5%), and the Visual Analogue Scale was the most commonly used domain-specific instrument (70%). There was a proportional decrease in the use of generic instruments, from 24% of studies in 2000–2004 to only 14% of studies in 2015–2019. Conversely, there was an increase in the use of hernia-specific instruments, from 0% in 2000–2004 to 18% in 2015–2019. Conclusions: There is heterogeneity in the use of patient-reported outcome measures in the field of inguinal hernia research. The use of hernia-specific instruments is increasing, the use of generic instruments is decreasing, and the use of domain-specific instruments remains consistently high. This study serves as a repository of all available patient-reported outcome measures relevant to patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair.

KW - Inguinal hernia

KW - Outcome assessment

KW - Patient-reported outcome

KW - PROM

KW - Questionnaire

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85092730382&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10029-020-02322-3

DO - 10.1007/s10029-020-02322-3

M3 - Review

C2 - 33074397

AN - SCOPUS:85092730382

VL - 25

SP - 1111

EP - 1120

JO - Hernia

JF - Hernia

SN - 1265-4906

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 68414227