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Trends in hospitalisation rates for inflammatory bowel disease in western versus newly industrialised countries: a population-based study of countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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  • James A King
  • Fox E Underwood
  • Nicola Panaccione
  • Josh Quan
  • Joseph W Windsor
  • Paulo G Kotze
  • Siew C Ng
  • Subrata Ghosh
  • Peter L Lakatos
  • Tine Jess
  • Remo Panaccione
  • Cynthia H Seow
  • Shomron Ben-Horin
  • Johan Burisch
  • Jean-Frédéric Colombel
  • Edward V Loftus
  • Richard Gearry
  • Jonas Halfvarson
  • Gilaad G Kaplan
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BACKGROUND: Hospitalisation rates for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) vary across the world. We aimed to investigate temporal patterns of hospitalisation for IBD in member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

METHODS: From the OECD database, we assessed IBD-related hospitalisation rates (expressed as annual rates per 100 000 inhabitants) for 34 countries from 1990 to 2016. We calculated mean hospitalisation rates for the period 2010-15 and used joinpoint regression models to calculate average annual percentage changes with 95% CIs.

FINDINGS: Mean hospitalisation rates for IBD from 2010 to 2015 were highest in North America (eg, 33·9 per 100 000 in the USA), Europe (eg, 72·9 per 100 000 in Austria), and Oceania (eg, 31·5 per 100 000 in Australia). Hospitalisation rates for IBD were stabilising or decreasing over time in many countries in these regions but increasing in others. Countries in Asia and Latin America and the Caribbean had the lowest IBD-related hospitalisation rates but the greatest increases in rates over time. For example, Turkey had an annual hospitalisation rate of 10·8 per 100 000 inhabitants and an average annual percentage change of 10·4% (95% CI 5·2-15·9). Similarly, Chile had an annual hospitalisation rate of 9·0 per 100 000 inhabitants and an average annual percentage change of 5·9% (4·9-7·0).

INTERPRETATION: Hospitalisation rates for IBD are high in western countries but are typically stabilising or decreasing, whereas rates in many newly industrialised countries are rapidly increasing, which reflects the known increase in IBD prevalence in these countries. Potential explanations for these trends include changes in the epidemiology of IBD, health-care delivery, and infrastructure in these countries, as well as overall country-specific patterns in hospitalisations and differences between countries in data collection methods.

FUNDING: None.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftThe Lancet Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Vol/bind4
Udgave nummer4
Sider (fra-til)287-295
Antal sider9
ISSN2468-1253
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1 apr. 2019

ID: 56562395