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Towards gene- and gender-based risk estimates in Lynch syndrome; age-specific incidences for 13 extra-colorectal cancer types

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BACKGROUND: In Lynch syndrome, inherited mismatch repair (MMR) defects predispose to colorectal cancer and to a wide spectrum of extra-colorectal tumours. Utilising a cohort study design, we aimed to determine the risk of extra-colorectal cancer and to identify yet unrecognised tumour types.

METHODS: Data from 1624 Lynch syndrome mutation carriers in the Danish hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer register were used to estimate the sex- and age-specific incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for 30 extra-colorectal malignancies with comparison to the general population.

RESULTS: Significantly increased IRRs were identified for 13 cancer types with differences related to gender, age and disease-predisposing gene. The different cancer types showed variable peak age incidence rates (IRs) with the highest IRs for ovarian cancer at age 30-49 years, for endometrial cancer, breast cancer, renal cell cancer and brain tumours at age 50-69 years, and for urothelial cancer, small bowel cancer, gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer and skin tumours after age 70.

CONCLUSIONS: The broad spectrum of tumour types that develop at an increased incidence defines Lynch syndrome as a multi-tumour syndrome. The variable incidences in relation to age, gender and gene suggest a need for individualised surveillance.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication 24 October 2017; doi:10.1038/bjc.2017.348 www.bjcancer.com.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftBritish Journal of Cancer
Vol/bind117
Udgave nummer11
Sider (fra-til)1702-1710
ISSN0007-0920
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1 dec. 2017

ID: 51951691