Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Time to start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the effect of target temperature management at 33°C and 36°C

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

Dankiewicz, J, Friberg, H, Bělohlávek, J, Walden, A, Hassager, C, Cronberg, T, Erlinge, D, Gasche, Y, Hovdenes, J, Horn, J, Kjaergaard, J, Kuiper, M, Pellis, T, Stammet, P, Wanscher, M, Wetterslev, J, Wise, M, Åneman, A & Nielsen, N 2016, 'Time to start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the effect of target temperature management at 33°C and 36°C' Resuscitation, bind 99, s. 44-49. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2015.10.013

APA

CBE

Dankiewicz J, Friberg H, Bělohlávek J, Walden A, Hassager C, Cronberg T, Erlinge D, Gasche Y, Hovdenes J, Horn J, Kjaergaard J, Kuiper M, Pellis T, Stammet P, Wanscher M, Wetterslev J, Wise M, Åneman A, Nielsen N. 2016. Time to start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the effect of target temperature management at 33°C and 36°C. Resuscitation. 99:44-49. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2015.10.013

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Dankiewicz, Josef ; Friberg, Hans ; Bělohlávek, Jan ; Walden, Andrew ; Hassager, Christian ; Cronberg, Tobias ; Erlinge, David ; Gasche, Yvan ; Hovdenes, Jan ; Horn, Janneke ; Kjaergaard, Jesper ; Kuiper, Michael ; Pellis, Thomas ; Stammet, Pascal ; Wanscher, Michael ; Wetterslev, Jørn ; Wise, Matthew ; Åneman, Anders ; Nielsen, Niklas. / Time to start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the effect of target temperature management at 33°C and 36°C. I: Resuscitation. 2016 ; Bind 99. s. 44-49.

Bibtex

@article{613b93e427064861a05b552932e44ab8,
title = "Time to start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the effect of target temperature management at 33°C and 36°C",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: The optimal temperature during targeted temperature management (TTM) for comatose patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is unknown. It has been hypothesized that patients with long no-flow times, for example those without bystander CPR would have the most to gain from temperature management at lower temperatures.METHODS: We analysed data from an international clinical trial randomizing cardiac arrest patients to targeted temperature management at 33°C and 36°C for an interaction between no-flow time and intervention group, with neurological function at six months after cardiac arrest as the primary outcome. A cerebral performance category (CPC) score of 1 or 2 was considered a good outcome.RESULTS: No-flow time (min) was associated with poor neurological outcome (OR 1.13, 95{\%} confidence interval 1.06-1.20, p<0.001). There was no statistically significant interaction between no flow-time and intervention group (p=0.11), which may imply that the non-superior effect of 33°C was consistent for all no-flow times. Bystander CPR was not independently associated with neurological function.CONCLUSIONS: TTM at 33°C compared to 36°C was not associated with an increased probability of a good neurological function for patients with longer no-flow times.",
author = "Josef Dankiewicz and Hans Friberg and Jan Bělohl{\'a}vek and Andrew Walden and Christian Hassager and Tobias Cronberg and David Erlinge and Yvan Gasche and Jan Hovdenes and Janneke Horn and Jesper Kjaergaard and Michael Kuiper and Thomas Pellis and Pascal Stammet and Michael Wanscher and J{\o}rn Wetterslev and Matthew Wise and Anders {\AA}neman and Niklas Nielsen",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1016/j.resuscitation.2015.10.013",
language = "English",
volume = "99",
pages = "44--49",
journal = "Resuscitation",
issn = "0300-9572",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Time to start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the effect of target temperature management at 33°C and 36°C

AU - Dankiewicz, Josef

AU - Friberg, Hans

AU - Bělohlávek, Jan

AU - Walden, Andrew

AU - Hassager, Christian

AU - Cronberg, Tobias

AU - Erlinge, David

AU - Gasche, Yvan

AU - Hovdenes, Jan

AU - Horn, Janneke

AU - Kjaergaard, Jesper

AU - Kuiper, Michael

AU - Pellis, Thomas

AU - Stammet, Pascal

AU - Wanscher, Michael

AU - Wetterslev, Jørn

AU - Wise, Matthew

AU - Åneman, Anders

AU - Nielsen, Niklas

N1 - Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - INTRODUCTION: The optimal temperature during targeted temperature management (TTM) for comatose patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is unknown. It has been hypothesized that patients with long no-flow times, for example those without bystander CPR would have the most to gain from temperature management at lower temperatures.METHODS: We analysed data from an international clinical trial randomizing cardiac arrest patients to targeted temperature management at 33°C and 36°C for an interaction between no-flow time and intervention group, with neurological function at six months after cardiac arrest as the primary outcome. A cerebral performance category (CPC) score of 1 or 2 was considered a good outcome.RESULTS: No-flow time (min) was associated with poor neurological outcome (OR 1.13, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.20, p<0.001). There was no statistically significant interaction between no flow-time and intervention group (p=0.11), which may imply that the non-superior effect of 33°C was consistent for all no-flow times. Bystander CPR was not independently associated with neurological function.CONCLUSIONS: TTM at 33°C compared to 36°C was not associated with an increased probability of a good neurological function for patients with longer no-flow times.

AB - INTRODUCTION: The optimal temperature during targeted temperature management (TTM) for comatose patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is unknown. It has been hypothesized that patients with long no-flow times, for example those without bystander CPR would have the most to gain from temperature management at lower temperatures.METHODS: We analysed data from an international clinical trial randomizing cardiac arrest patients to targeted temperature management at 33°C and 36°C for an interaction between no-flow time and intervention group, with neurological function at six months after cardiac arrest as the primary outcome. A cerebral performance category (CPC) score of 1 or 2 was considered a good outcome.RESULTS: No-flow time (min) was associated with poor neurological outcome (OR 1.13, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.20, p<0.001). There was no statistically significant interaction between no flow-time and intervention group (p=0.11), which may imply that the non-superior effect of 33°C was consistent for all no-flow times. Bystander CPR was not independently associated with neurological function.CONCLUSIONS: TTM at 33°C compared to 36°C was not associated with an increased probability of a good neurological function for patients with longer no-flow times.

U2 - 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2015.10.013

DO - 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2015.10.013

M3 - Journal article

VL - 99

SP - 44

EP - 49

JO - Resuscitation

JF - Resuscitation

SN - 0300-9572

ER -

ID: 45942002