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Thyroid function in COVID-19 and the association with cytokine levels and mortality

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@article{d6dbc0fdf9aa4f7cb86f1d05eeed872c,
title = "Thyroid function in COVID-19 and the association with cytokine levels and mortality",
abstract = "The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid hormone axis might be affected in COVID-19, but existing studies have shown varying results. It has been hypothesized that hyperinflammation, as reflected by the secretion of cytokines, might induce thyroid dysfunction among patients with COVID-19. We explored thyroid hormone involvement in the acute phase of symptomatic COVID-19 and its possible associations with cytokine levels and mortality risk. This was a single-center study of 116 consecutive patients hospitalized for moderate-to-severe COVID-19 disease. Serum concentrations of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (T4), and 45 cytokines/chemokines were measured in all patients within 3 days of admission. Data were extracted retrospectively through a manual review of health records. At admission, 95 (81.9%) were euthyroid; while 21 (18.1%) had biochemically thyroid dysfunction including subclinical thyrotoxicosis (n = 11), overt thyrotoxicosis (n = 2), hypothyroidism (n = 1), non-thyroidal illness (n = 2), and normal TSH but high free T4 (n = 5). TSH levels were inversely correlated with IL-8 (rs = -0.248), IL-10 (rs = -0.253), IL-15 (rs = -0.213), IP-10 (rs = -0.334), and GM-CSF (rs = -0.254). Moreover, IL-8 levels, IP-10, and GM-CSF were significantly higher in patients with serum TSH < 0.4 mIU/L. Lastly, a two-fold increment of IL-8 and IL-10 was associated with significantly higher odds of having TSH < 0.4 mIU/L (odds ratio 1.86 (1.11-3.10) and 1.78 (1.03-3.06)). Serum TSH was not associated with 30- or 90-day mortality. In conclusion, this study suggests that fluctuations of TSH levels in patients with COVID-19 may be influenced by circulating IL-8, IL-10, IL-15, IP-10, and GM-CSF as previously described in autoimmune thyroid diseases.",
keywords = "COVID-19, IL-10, IL-8, SARS-CoV-2, cytokines, mortality, thyroid function, thyroid gland",
author = "Clausen, {Clara Lundetoft} and Rasmussen, {{\AA}se Krogh} and Johannsen, {Trine Holm} and Hilsted, {Linda Maria} and Skakkeb{\ae}k, {Niels Erik} and Szecsi, {Pal Bela} and Lise Pedersen and Thomas Benfield and Anders Juul",
year = "2021",
month = sep,
day = "28",
doi = "10.1530/EC-21-0301",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "1234--1242",
journal = "Endocrine Connections",
issn = "2049-3614",
publisher = "BioScientifica Ltd",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Thyroid function in COVID-19 and the association with cytokine levels and mortality

AU - Clausen, Clara Lundetoft

AU - Rasmussen, Åse Krogh

AU - Johannsen, Trine Holm

AU - Hilsted, Linda Maria

AU - Skakkebæk, Niels Erik

AU - Szecsi, Pal Bela

AU - Pedersen, Lise

AU - Benfield, Thomas

AU - Juul, Anders

PY - 2021/9/28

Y1 - 2021/9/28

N2 - The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid hormone axis might be affected in COVID-19, but existing studies have shown varying results. It has been hypothesized that hyperinflammation, as reflected by the secretion of cytokines, might induce thyroid dysfunction among patients with COVID-19. We explored thyroid hormone involvement in the acute phase of symptomatic COVID-19 and its possible associations with cytokine levels and mortality risk. This was a single-center study of 116 consecutive patients hospitalized for moderate-to-severe COVID-19 disease. Serum concentrations of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (T4), and 45 cytokines/chemokines were measured in all patients within 3 days of admission. Data were extracted retrospectively through a manual review of health records. At admission, 95 (81.9%) were euthyroid; while 21 (18.1%) had biochemically thyroid dysfunction including subclinical thyrotoxicosis (n = 11), overt thyrotoxicosis (n = 2), hypothyroidism (n = 1), non-thyroidal illness (n = 2), and normal TSH but high free T4 (n = 5). TSH levels were inversely correlated with IL-8 (rs = -0.248), IL-10 (rs = -0.253), IL-15 (rs = -0.213), IP-10 (rs = -0.334), and GM-CSF (rs = -0.254). Moreover, IL-8 levels, IP-10, and GM-CSF were significantly higher in patients with serum TSH < 0.4 mIU/L. Lastly, a two-fold increment of IL-8 and IL-10 was associated with significantly higher odds of having TSH < 0.4 mIU/L (odds ratio 1.86 (1.11-3.10) and 1.78 (1.03-3.06)). Serum TSH was not associated with 30- or 90-day mortality. In conclusion, this study suggests that fluctuations of TSH levels in patients with COVID-19 may be influenced by circulating IL-8, IL-10, IL-15, IP-10, and GM-CSF as previously described in autoimmune thyroid diseases.

AB - The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid hormone axis might be affected in COVID-19, but existing studies have shown varying results. It has been hypothesized that hyperinflammation, as reflected by the secretion of cytokines, might induce thyroid dysfunction among patients with COVID-19. We explored thyroid hormone involvement in the acute phase of symptomatic COVID-19 and its possible associations with cytokine levels and mortality risk. This was a single-center study of 116 consecutive patients hospitalized for moderate-to-severe COVID-19 disease. Serum concentrations of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (T4), and 45 cytokines/chemokines were measured in all patients within 3 days of admission. Data were extracted retrospectively through a manual review of health records. At admission, 95 (81.9%) were euthyroid; while 21 (18.1%) had biochemically thyroid dysfunction including subclinical thyrotoxicosis (n = 11), overt thyrotoxicosis (n = 2), hypothyroidism (n = 1), non-thyroidal illness (n = 2), and normal TSH but high free T4 (n = 5). TSH levels were inversely correlated with IL-8 (rs = -0.248), IL-10 (rs = -0.253), IL-15 (rs = -0.213), IP-10 (rs = -0.334), and GM-CSF (rs = -0.254). Moreover, IL-8 levels, IP-10, and GM-CSF were significantly higher in patients with serum TSH < 0.4 mIU/L. Lastly, a two-fold increment of IL-8 and IL-10 was associated with significantly higher odds of having TSH < 0.4 mIU/L (odds ratio 1.86 (1.11-3.10) and 1.78 (1.03-3.06)). Serum TSH was not associated with 30- or 90-day mortality. In conclusion, this study suggests that fluctuations of TSH levels in patients with COVID-19 may be influenced by circulating IL-8, IL-10, IL-15, IP-10, and GM-CSF as previously described in autoimmune thyroid diseases.

KW - COVID-19

KW - IL-10

KW - IL-8

KW - SARS-CoV-2

KW - cytokines

KW - mortality

KW - thyroid function

KW - thyroid gland

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85117616395&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1530/EC-21-0301

DO - 10.1530/EC-21-0301

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34468398

VL - 10

SP - 1234

EP - 1242

JO - Endocrine Connections

JF - Endocrine Connections

SN - 2049-3614

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 67447019