The socio-cultural context and practical implications of ethnoveterinary medical pluralism in western Kenya

Peter Auma Nyamanga*, Collette Suda, Jens Aagaard-Hansen

*Corresponding author af dette arbejde
14 Citationer (Scopus)

Abstract

This article discusses ethnoveterinary medical pluralism in Western Kenya. Qualitative methods of data collection such as key informant interviews, open-ended in-depth interviews, focus group discussions (FGDs), narratives, and participant and direct observations were applied. The study shows that farmers in Nyang'oma seek both curative and preventive medical services for their animals from the broad range of health care providers available to them within a pluralistic medical system. Kleinman's model of medical pluralism, which describes the professional, folk, and popular sectors, informs this discussion because of its relevance and appropriateness to the study. It is, however, important to note the overlap in the three sectors and to point out that livestock farmers engage in multiple "consultations" based on a combination of their own characteristics and the cost, availability and specialization of health care providers. The study concludes by recognizing the complexity of ethnoveterinary medical pluralism and calls for the integration of a pluralistic perspective into the planning and implementation of animal health care interventions and services.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAgriculture and Human Values
Vol/bind25
Udgave nummer4
Sider (fra-til)513-527
Antal sider15
ISSN0889-048X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 22 apr. 2008
Udgivet eksterntJa

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