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The Ruptured Achilles Tendon Elongates for 6 Months After Surgical Repair Regardless of Early or Late Weightbearing in Combination With Ankle Mobilization: A Randomized Clinical Trial

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@article{10b1450116694586b7a5912337fdaede,
title = "The Ruptured Achilles Tendon Elongates for 6 Months After Surgical Repair Regardless of Early or Late Weightbearing in Combination With Ankle Mobilization: A Randomized Clinical Trial",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Treatment strategies for Achilles tendon rupture vary considerably, and clinical outcome may depend on the magnitude of tendon elongation after surgical repair. The aim of this project was to examine whether tendon elongation, mechanical properties, and functional outcomes during rehabilitation of surgically repaired acute Achilles tendon ruptures were influenced by different rehabilitation regimens during the early postsurgical period.HYPOTHESIS: Restricted early weightbearing that permits only limited motion about the ankle in the early phase of tendon healing limits tendon elongation and improves functional outcome.STUDY DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1.METHODS: 75 consecutive patients with an acute Achilles tendon rupture were included. They underwent surgical repair, and tantalum beads were placed in the distal and proximal parts of the tendon; thereafter, the patients were randomized into 3 groups. The first group was completely restricted from weightbearing until week 7. The second group was completely restricted from weightbearing until week 7 but performed ankle joint mobilization exercises. The first and second groups were allowed full weightbearing after week 8. The third group was allowed partial weightbearing from day 1 and full weightbearing from week 5. All patients received the same instructions in home exercise guidelines starting from week 9.RESULTS: The rehabilitation regimen in the initial 8 weeks did not significantly influence any of the measured outcomes including tendon elongation. Achilles tendon elongation and tendon compliance continued for up to 6 months after surgery, and muscle strength, muscle endurance, and patient-reported functional scores did not reach normal values at 12 months.CONCLUSION: Differences in rehabilitation loading pattern in the initial 8 weeks after the repair of an Achilles tendon rupture did not measurably alter the outcome. The time to recover full function after an Achilles tendon rupture is at least 12 months. Registration: NCT02422004 ( ClinicalTrials.gov identifier).",
author = "Pernilla Eliasson and Anne-Sofie Agergaard and Christian Coupp{\'e} and Ren{\'e} Svensson and Rikke Hoeffner and Susan Warming and Nichlas Warming and Christina Holm and Jensen, {Mikkel Holm} and Michael Krogsgaard and Michael Kjaer and Magnusson, {S Peter}",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1177/0363546518781826",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "2492--2502",
journal = "American Journal of Sports Medicine",
issn = "0363-5465",
publisher = "Sage Science Press (US)",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Ruptured Achilles Tendon Elongates for 6 Months After Surgical Repair Regardless of Early or Late Weightbearing in Combination With Ankle Mobilization

T2 - A Randomized Clinical Trial

AU - Eliasson, Pernilla

AU - Agergaard, Anne-Sofie

AU - Couppé, Christian

AU - Svensson, René

AU - Hoeffner, Rikke

AU - Warming, Susan

AU - Warming, Nichlas

AU - Holm, Christina

AU - Jensen, Mikkel Holm

AU - Krogsgaard, Michael

AU - Kjaer, Michael

AU - Magnusson, S Peter

PY - 2018/8

Y1 - 2018/8

N2 - BACKGROUND: Treatment strategies for Achilles tendon rupture vary considerably, and clinical outcome may depend on the magnitude of tendon elongation after surgical repair. The aim of this project was to examine whether tendon elongation, mechanical properties, and functional outcomes during rehabilitation of surgically repaired acute Achilles tendon ruptures were influenced by different rehabilitation regimens during the early postsurgical period.HYPOTHESIS: Restricted early weightbearing that permits only limited motion about the ankle in the early phase of tendon healing limits tendon elongation and improves functional outcome.STUDY DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1.METHODS: 75 consecutive patients with an acute Achilles tendon rupture were included. They underwent surgical repair, and tantalum beads were placed in the distal and proximal parts of the tendon; thereafter, the patients were randomized into 3 groups. The first group was completely restricted from weightbearing until week 7. The second group was completely restricted from weightbearing until week 7 but performed ankle joint mobilization exercises. The first and second groups were allowed full weightbearing after week 8. The third group was allowed partial weightbearing from day 1 and full weightbearing from week 5. All patients received the same instructions in home exercise guidelines starting from week 9.RESULTS: The rehabilitation regimen in the initial 8 weeks did not significantly influence any of the measured outcomes including tendon elongation. Achilles tendon elongation and tendon compliance continued for up to 6 months after surgery, and muscle strength, muscle endurance, and patient-reported functional scores did not reach normal values at 12 months.CONCLUSION: Differences in rehabilitation loading pattern in the initial 8 weeks after the repair of an Achilles tendon rupture did not measurably alter the outcome. The time to recover full function after an Achilles tendon rupture is at least 12 months. Registration: NCT02422004 ( ClinicalTrials.gov identifier).

AB - BACKGROUND: Treatment strategies for Achilles tendon rupture vary considerably, and clinical outcome may depend on the magnitude of tendon elongation after surgical repair. The aim of this project was to examine whether tendon elongation, mechanical properties, and functional outcomes during rehabilitation of surgically repaired acute Achilles tendon ruptures were influenced by different rehabilitation regimens during the early postsurgical period.HYPOTHESIS: Restricted early weightbearing that permits only limited motion about the ankle in the early phase of tendon healing limits tendon elongation and improves functional outcome.STUDY DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1.METHODS: 75 consecutive patients with an acute Achilles tendon rupture were included. They underwent surgical repair, and tantalum beads were placed in the distal and proximal parts of the tendon; thereafter, the patients were randomized into 3 groups. The first group was completely restricted from weightbearing until week 7. The second group was completely restricted from weightbearing until week 7 but performed ankle joint mobilization exercises. The first and second groups were allowed full weightbearing after week 8. The third group was allowed partial weightbearing from day 1 and full weightbearing from week 5. All patients received the same instructions in home exercise guidelines starting from week 9.RESULTS: The rehabilitation regimen in the initial 8 weeks did not significantly influence any of the measured outcomes including tendon elongation. Achilles tendon elongation and tendon compliance continued for up to 6 months after surgery, and muscle strength, muscle endurance, and patient-reported functional scores did not reach normal values at 12 months.CONCLUSION: Differences in rehabilitation loading pattern in the initial 8 weeks after the repair of an Achilles tendon rupture did not measurably alter the outcome. The time to recover full function after an Achilles tendon rupture is at least 12 months. Registration: NCT02422004 ( ClinicalTrials.gov identifier).

U2 - 10.1177/0363546518781826

DO - 10.1177/0363546518781826

M3 - Journal article

VL - 46

SP - 2492

EP - 2502

JO - American Journal of Sports Medicine

JF - American Journal of Sports Medicine

SN - 0363-5465

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 56199085