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The role of endogenous GIP and GLP-1 in postprandial bone homeostasis

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The incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) are well known for their insulinotropic effects and they are thought to affect bone homeostasis as mediators in the so-called entero-osseous axis. We examined the contributions of endogenous GIP and GLP-1, respectively, to postprandial bone homeostasis, in healthy subjects in two randomized and double-blind crossover studies. We included healthy men who received either four oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) (n = 18, median age 27 (range 20-70), BMI 27.2 (22.4-37.0) kg/m2) or liquid mixed meal tests (MMTs) (n = 12, age 23 (19-65), BMI 23.7 (20.3-25.5) kg/m2) with infusions of 1) the GIP receptor antagonist GIP(3-30)NH2, 2) the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39)NH2, 3) both GIP(3-30)NH2 and exendin(9-39)NH2, or 4) placebo infusions (saline) on four separate visits. Bone resorption was evaluated from levels of circulating carboxy-terminal collagen crosslinks (CTX) and bone formation from levels of procollagen type 1 amino-terminal propeptide (P1NP). During placebo infusions, baseline-subtracted area under the curve values for CTX were -39 ± 5.0 (OGTT) and -57 ± 4.3 ng/ml × min (MMT). When GIP(3-30)NH2 was administered, CTX suppression was significantly diminished compared to placebo (-30 ± 4.8 (OGTT) and -45 ± 4.6 ng/ml × min (MMT), P = 0.0104 and P = 0.0288, respectively, compared to placebo. During exendin(9-39)NH2 infusion, CTX suppression after OGTT/MMT was similar to placebo (P = 0.28 (OGTT) and P = 0.93 (MMT)). The relative contribution of endogenous GIP to postprandial suppression of bone resorption during both OGTT and MMT was similar and reached 22-25%. There were no differences in P1NP concentrations between interventions. In conclusion, endogenous GIP contributes by up to 25% to postprandial suppression of bone resorption in humans whereas an effect of endogenous GLP-1 could not be demonstrated.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer115553
TidsskriftBone
Vol/bind140
Sider (fra-til)115553
ISSN8756-3282
DOI
StatusUdgivet - nov. 2020

Bibliografisk note

Funding Information:
The clinical studies were conducted at Center for Clinical Metabolic Research (Gentofte Hospital, Denmark) and were supported by the European Foundation for the Study of Diabetes (EFSD), Germany and the Novo Nordisk Foundation , Denmark.

ID: 61311127