Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

The Role of Daylight for Humans: Gaps in Current Knowledge

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Variations in seasonal solar insolation are associated with a history of suicide attempts in bipolar I disorder

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Light therapy for seasonal affective disorder in visual impairment and blindness - a pilot study

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Reducing the rate of psychiatric Re-ADMISsions in Bipolar Disorder using smartphones The RADMIS trial

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Melanopsin-mediated pupillary responses in bipolar disorder-a cross-sectional pupillometric investigation

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  • Mirjam Münch
  • Anna Wirz-Justice
  • Steven A Brown
  • Thomas Kantermann
  • Klaus Martiny
  • Oliver Stefani
  • Céline Vetter
  • Kenneth P Wright
  • Katharina Wulff
  • Debra J Skene
Vis graf over relationer

Daylight stems solely from direct, scattered and reflected sunlight, and undergoes dynamic changes in irradiance and spectral power composition due to latitude, time of day, time of year and the nature of the physical environment (reflections, buildings and vegetation). Humans and their ancestors evolved under these natural day/night cycles over millions of years. Electric light, a relatively recent invention, interacts and competes with the natural light-dark cycle to impact human biology. What are the consequences of living in industrialised urban areas with much less daylight and more use of electric light, throughout the day (and at night), on general health and quality of life? In this workshop report, we have classified key gaps of knowledge in daylight research into three main groups: (I) uncertainty as to daylight quantity and quality needed for "optimal" physiological and psychological functioning, (II) lack of consensus on practical measurement and assessment methods and tools for monitoring real (day) light exposure across multiple time scales, and (III) insufficient integration and exchange of daylight knowledge bases from different disciplines. Crucial short and long-term objectives to fill these gaps are proposed.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftClocks & sleep
Vol/bind2
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)61-85
Antal sider25
ISSN2624-5175
DOI
StatusUdgivet - mar. 2020

Bibliografisk note

© 2020 by the authors.

ID: 61455668