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The prevalence of submicroscopic Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte carriage and multiplicity of infection in children, pregnant women and adults in a low malaria transmission area in Southern Ghana

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Lamptey, Helena ; Ofori, Michael Fokuo ; Kusi, Kwadwo Asamoah ; Adu, Bright ; Owusu-Yeboa, Eunice ; Kyei-Baafour, Eric ; Arku, Andrea Twumwaa ; Bosomprah, Samuel ; Alifrangis, Michael ; Quakyi, Isabella A. / The prevalence of submicroscopic Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte carriage and multiplicity of infection in children, pregnant women and adults in a low malaria transmission area in Southern Ghana. I: Malaria Journal. 2018 ; Bind 17, Nr. 1. s. 331.

Bibtex

@article{e17b0285303040fe9fc553927b778350,
title = "The prevalence of submicroscopic Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte carriage and multiplicity of infection in children, pregnant women and adults in a low malaria transmission area in Southern Ghana",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: The gametocyte stage of Plasmodium falciparum is considered an important target for disrupting malaria transmission. Indications are that various demographic groups, such as children and pregnant women may differ in risk of harbouring gametocytes, which may be crucial for targeted control. In this study, the relationship between the prevalence and multiplicity of P. falciparum, asexual parasite infections and gametocytaemia was assessed in three different demographic groups in an area of southern Ghana with low malaria endemicity. Levels of antibody responses to Pfs230 were also assessed as a proxy for the presence of gametocytes.METHODS: The study involved multiple cross-sectional sampling of children (N = 184, aged 2-15 years), male and non-pregnant female adults (N = 154, aged 16-65 years) and pregnant women (N = 125, aged 18-45 years) from Asutsuare in the Shai Osudoku District of Greater Accra Region in Ghana. Asexual parasitaemia was detected by microscopy and PCR, and gametocytaemia was assessed by Pfs25-real time PCR. Multiclonal P. falciparum infections were estimated by msp2 genotyping and an indirect ELISA was used to measure plasma IgG antibodies to Pfs230 antigen.RESULTS: Overall, children and pregnant women had higher prevalence of submicroscopic gametocytes (39.5{\%} and 29.7{\%}, respectively) compared to adults (17.4{\%}). Multiplicity of infection observed amongst children (3.1) and pregnant women (3.9) were found to be significantly higher (P = 0.006) compared with adults (2.7). Risk of gametocyte carriage was higher in individuals infected with P. falciparum having both Pfmsp2 3D7 and FC27 parasite types (OR = 5.92, 95{\%} CI 1.56-22.54, P = 0.009) compared with those infected with only 3D7 or FC27 parasite types. In agreement with the parasite prevalence data, anti-Pfs230 antibody levels were lower in gametocyte positive adults (β = - 0.57, 95{\%} CI - 0.81, - 0.34, P < 0.001) compared to children.CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that children and pregnant women are particularly important as P. falciparum submicroscopic gametocyte reservoirs and represent important focus groups for control interventions. The number of clones increased in individuals carrying gametocytes compared to those who did not carry gametocytes. The higher anti-gametocyte antibody levels in children suggests recent exposure and may be a marker of gametocyte carriage.",
keywords = "Adolescent, Adult, Antibodies, Protozoan/blood, Antigens, Protozoan/genetics, Carrier State/epidemiology, Child, Child, Preschool, Cross-Sectional Studies, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, Female, Genotype, Ghana/epidemiology, Humans, Immunoglobulin G/blood, Malaria, Falciparum/epidemiology, Male, Microscopy, Middle Aged, Parasitemia/epidemiology, Plasmodium falciparum/isolation & purification, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology, Prevalence, Protozoan Proteins/genetics, Young Adult",
author = "Helena Lamptey and Ofori, {Michael Fokuo} and Kusi, {Kwadwo Asamoah} and Bright Adu and Eunice Owusu-Yeboa and Eric Kyei-Baafour and Arku, {Andrea Twumwaa} and Samuel Bosomprah and Michael Alifrangis and Quakyi, {Isabella A}",
year = "2018",
month = "9",
day = "17",
doi = "10.1186/s12936-018-2479-y",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "331",
journal = "Malaria Journal",
issn = "1475-2875",
publisher = "BioMed Central Ltd",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The prevalence of submicroscopic Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte carriage and multiplicity of infection in children, pregnant women and adults in a low malaria transmission area in Southern Ghana

AU - Lamptey, Helena

AU - Ofori, Michael Fokuo

AU - Kusi, Kwadwo Asamoah

AU - Adu, Bright

AU - Owusu-Yeboa, Eunice

AU - Kyei-Baafour, Eric

AU - Arku, Andrea Twumwaa

AU - Bosomprah, Samuel

AU - Alifrangis, Michael

AU - Quakyi, Isabella A

PY - 2018/9/17

Y1 - 2018/9/17

N2 - BACKGROUND: The gametocyte stage of Plasmodium falciparum is considered an important target for disrupting malaria transmission. Indications are that various demographic groups, such as children and pregnant women may differ in risk of harbouring gametocytes, which may be crucial for targeted control. In this study, the relationship between the prevalence and multiplicity of P. falciparum, asexual parasite infections and gametocytaemia was assessed in three different demographic groups in an area of southern Ghana with low malaria endemicity. Levels of antibody responses to Pfs230 were also assessed as a proxy for the presence of gametocytes.METHODS: The study involved multiple cross-sectional sampling of children (N = 184, aged 2-15 years), male and non-pregnant female adults (N = 154, aged 16-65 years) and pregnant women (N = 125, aged 18-45 years) from Asutsuare in the Shai Osudoku District of Greater Accra Region in Ghana. Asexual parasitaemia was detected by microscopy and PCR, and gametocytaemia was assessed by Pfs25-real time PCR. Multiclonal P. falciparum infections were estimated by msp2 genotyping and an indirect ELISA was used to measure plasma IgG antibodies to Pfs230 antigen.RESULTS: Overall, children and pregnant women had higher prevalence of submicroscopic gametocytes (39.5% and 29.7%, respectively) compared to adults (17.4%). Multiplicity of infection observed amongst children (3.1) and pregnant women (3.9) were found to be significantly higher (P = 0.006) compared with adults (2.7). Risk of gametocyte carriage was higher in individuals infected with P. falciparum having both Pfmsp2 3D7 and FC27 parasite types (OR = 5.92, 95% CI 1.56-22.54, P = 0.009) compared with those infected with only 3D7 or FC27 parasite types. In agreement with the parasite prevalence data, anti-Pfs230 antibody levels were lower in gametocyte positive adults (β = - 0.57, 95% CI - 0.81, - 0.34, P < 0.001) compared to children.CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that children and pregnant women are particularly important as P. falciparum submicroscopic gametocyte reservoirs and represent important focus groups for control interventions. The number of clones increased in individuals carrying gametocytes compared to those who did not carry gametocytes. The higher anti-gametocyte antibody levels in children suggests recent exposure and may be a marker of gametocyte carriage.

AB - BACKGROUND: The gametocyte stage of Plasmodium falciparum is considered an important target for disrupting malaria transmission. Indications are that various demographic groups, such as children and pregnant women may differ in risk of harbouring gametocytes, which may be crucial for targeted control. In this study, the relationship between the prevalence and multiplicity of P. falciparum, asexual parasite infections and gametocytaemia was assessed in three different demographic groups in an area of southern Ghana with low malaria endemicity. Levels of antibody responses to Pfs230 were also assessed as a proxy for the presence of gametocytes.METHODS: The study involved multiple cross-sectional sampling of children (N = 184, aged 2-15 years), male and non-pregnant female adults (N = 154, aged 16-65 years) and pregnant women (N = 125, aged 18-45 years) from Asutsuare in the Shai Osudoku District of Greater Accra Region in Ghana. Asexual parasitaemia was detected by microscopy and PCR, and gametocytaemia was assessed by Pfs25-real time PCR. Multiclonal P. falciparum infections were estimated by msp2 genotyping and an indirect ELISA was used to measure plasma IgG antibodies to Pfs230 antigen.RESULTS: Overall, children and pregnant women had higher prevalence of submicroscopic gametocytes (39.5% and 29.7%, respectively) compared to adults (17.4%). Multiplicity of infection observed amongst children (3.1) and pregnant women (3.9) were found to be significantly higher (P = 0.006) compared with adults (2.7). Risk of gametocyte carriage was higher in individuals infected with P. falciparum having both Pfmsp2 3D7 and FC27 parasite types (OR = 5.92, 95% CI 1.56-22.54, P = 0.009) compared with those infected with only 3D7 or FC27 parasite types. In agreement with the parasite prevalence data, anti-Pfs230 antibody levels were lower in gametocyte positive adults (β = - 0.57, 95% CI - 0.81, - 0.34, P < 0.001) compared to children.CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that children and pregnant women are particularly important as P. falciparum submicroscopic gametocyte reservoirs and represent important focus groups for control interventions. The number of clones increased in individuals carrying gametocytes compared to those who did not carry gametocytes. The higher anti-gametocyte antibody levels in children suggests recent exposure and may be a marker of gametocyte carriage.

KW - Adolescent

KW - Adult

KW - Antibodies, Protozoan/blood

KW - Antigens, Protozoan/genetics

KW - Carrier State/epidemiology

KW - Child

KW - Child, Preschool

KW - Cross-Sectional Studies

KW - Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

KW - Female

KW - Genotype

KW - Ghana/epidemiology

KW - Humans

KW - Immunoglobulin G/blood

KW - Malaria, Falciparum/epidemiology

KW - Male

KW - Microscopy

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Parasitemia/epidemiology

KW - Plasmodium falciparum/isolation & purification

KW - Polymerase Chain Reaction

KW - Pregnancy

KW - Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology

KW - Prevalence

KW - Protozoan Proteins/genetics

KW - Young Adult

U2 - 10.1186/s12936-018-2479-y

DO - 10.1186/s12936-018-2479-y

M3 - Journal article

VL - 17

SP - 331

JO - Malaria Journal

JF - Malaria Journal

SN - 1475-2875

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 56450945