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The impact of health-related quality of life and depressive symptoms on blood donor career-Results from the Danish blood donor study

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Vis graf over relationer

BACKGROUND: Blood donors report better health-related quality of life (HRQL) than non-donors. Likewise, donors reporting good health are less likely to stop donating and have a higher donation frequency. This is evidence of the healthy donor effect (HDE). This study is the first to investigate the impact of HRQL and depressive symptoms on subsequent donor career.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Prospective cohort study includes 102,065 participants from the Danish Blood Donor Study applying the 12-item short-form health survey (SF-12) measuring a mental (MCS) and a physical component score (PCS) and the Major Depression Inventory (MDI). Poisson and Cox regression models were used to assess the effect of SF-12 and MDI scores on donation frequency and donor cessation. Higher MCS/PCS scores indicate good HRQL, while higher MDI score indicates higher experience of depressive symptoms.

RESULTS: For both sexes, MCS was positively correlated with donation frequency for up to 5 years, and similarly for PCS among women. A negative correlation between MDI score and donation frequency in the year following assessment was observed only among men. No correlation was observed among women. An increase in both MCS and PCS was associated with a lower risk of donation cessation in both sexes, while an increase in MDI score was only associated with an increased risk of donation cessation in men.

CONCLUSION: MCS, PCS, and MDI score affect donor career. Thus, adjusting for donation frequency may reduce HDE-bias in donor health research. However, because of the small effect sizes, other ways of quantifying HDE may be beneficial.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftTransfusion
Vol/bind61
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)1479-1488
Antal sider10
ISSN0041-1132
DOI
StatusUdgivet - maj 2021

Bibliografisk note

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