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The impact of early body-weight variability on long-term weight maintenance: exploratory results from the NoHoW weight-loss maintenance intervention

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Turicchi, Jake ; O'Driscoll, Ruairi ; Lowe, Michael ; Finlayson, Graham ; Palmeira, Antonio L ; Larsen, Sofus C ; Heitmann, Berit L ; Stubbs, James. / The impact of early body-weight variability on long-term weight maintenance : exploratory results from the NoHoW weight-loss maintenance intervention. I: International journal of obesity (2005). 2021 ; Bind 45, Nr. 3. s. 525-534.

Bibtex

@article{b7295b0df20b4eae9060123ad0150fb9,
title = "The impact of early body-weight variability on long-term weight maintenance: exploratory results from the NoHoW weight-loss maintenance intervention",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Weight-loss programmes often achieve short-term success though subsequent weight regain is common. The ability to identify predictive factors of regain early in the weight maintenance phase is crucial.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the associations between short-term weight variability and long-term weight outcomes in individuals engaged in a weight-loss maintenance intervention.METHODS: The study was a secondary analysis from The NoHoW trial, an 18-month weight maintenance intervention in individuals who recently lost ≥5% body weight. Eligible participants (n = 715, 64% women, BMI = 29.2 (SD 5.0) kg/m2, age = 45.8 (SD 11.5) years) provided body-weight data by smart scale (Fitbit Aria 2) over 18 months. Variability in body weight was calculated by linear and non-linear methods over the first 6, 9 and 12 weeks. These estimates were used to predict percentage weight change at 6, 12, and 18 months using both crude and adjusted multiple linear regression models.RESULTS: Greater non-linear weight variability over the first 6, 9 and 12 weeks was associated with increased subsequent weight in all comparisons; as was greater linear weight variability measured over 12 weeks (up to AdjR2 = 4.7%). Following adjustment, 6-week weight variability did not predict weight change in any model, though greater 9-week weight variability by non-linear methods was associated with increased body-weight change at 12 (∆AdjR2 = 1.2%) and 18 months (∆AdjR2 = 1.3%) and by linear methods at 18 months (∆AdjR2 = 1.1%). Greater non-linear weight variability measured over 12 weeks was associated with increased weight at 12 (∆AdjR2 = 1.4%) and 18 (∆AdjR2 = 2.2%) months; and 12-week linear variability was associated with increased weight at 12 (∆AdjR2 = 2.1%) and 18 (∆AdjR2 = 3.6%) months.CONCLUSION: Body-weight variability over the first 9 and 12 weeks of a weight-loss maintenance intervention weakly predicted increased weight at 12 and 18 months. These results suggest a potentially important role in continuously measuring body weight and estimating weight variability.",
author = "Jake Turicchi and Ruairi O'Driscoll and Michael Lowe and Graham Finlayson and Palmeira, {Antonio L} and Larsen, {Sofus C} and Heitmann, {Berit L} and James Stubbs",
year = "2021",
month = mar,
doi = "10.1038/s41366-020-00706-0",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "525--534",
journal = "International Journal of Obesity",
issn = "0307-0565",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The impact of early body-weight variability on long-term weight maintenance

T2 - exploratory results from the NoHoW weight-loss maintenance intervention

AU - Turicchi, Jake

AU - O'Driscoll, Ruairi

AU - Lowe, Michael

AU - Finlayson, Graham

AU - Palmeira, Antonio L

AU - Larsen, Sofus C

AU - Heitmann, Berit L

AU - Stubbs, James

PY - 2021/3

Y1 - 2021/3

N2 - BACKGROUND: Weight-loss programmes often achieve short-term success though subsequent weight regain is common. The ability to identify predictive factors of regain early in the weight maintenance phase is crucial.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the associations between short-term weight variability and long-term weight outcomes in individuals engaged in a weight-loss maintenance intervention.METHODS: The study was a secondary analysis from The NoHoW trial, an 18-month weight maintenance intervention in individuals who recently lost ≥5% body weight. Eligible participants (n = 715, 64% women, BMI = 29.2 (SD 5.0) kg/m2, age = 45.8 (SD 11.5) years) provided body-weight data by smart scale (Fitbit Aria 2) over 18 months. Variability in body weight was calculated by linear and non-linear methods over the first 6, 9 and 12 weeks. These estimates were used to predict percentage weight change at 6, 12, and 18 months using both crude and adjusted multiple linear regression models.RESULTS: Greater non-linear weight variability over the first 6, 9 and 12 weeks was associated with increased subsequent weight in all comparisons; as was greater linear weight variability measured over 12 weeks (up to AdjR2 = 4.7%). Following adjustment, 6-week weight variability did not predict weight change in any model, though greater 9-week weight variability by non-linear methods was associated with increased body-weight change at 12 (∆AdjR2 = 1.2%) and 18 months (∆AdjR2 = 1.3%) and by linear methods at 18 months (∆AdjR2 = 1.1%). Greater non-linear weight variability measured over 12 weeks was associated with increased weight at 12 (∆AdjR2 = 1.4%) and 18 (∆AdjR2 = 2.2%) months; and 12-week linear variability was associated with increased weight at 12 (∆AdjR2 = 2.1%) and 18 (∆AdjR2 = 3.6%) months.CONCLUSION: Body-weight variability over the first 9 and 12 weeks of a weight-loss maintenance intervention weakly predicted increased weight at 12 and 18 months. These results suggest a potentially important role in continuously measuring body weight and estimating weight variability.

AB - BACKGROUND: Weight-loss programmes often achieve short-term success though subsequent weight regain is common. The ability to identify predictive factors of regain early in the weight maintenance phase is crucial.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the associations between short-term weight variability and long-term weight outcomes in individuals engaged in a weight-loss maintenance intervention.METHODS: The study was a secondary analysis from The NoHoW trial, an 18-month weight maintenance intervention in individuals who recently lost ≥5% body weight. Eligible participants (n = 715, 64% women, BMI = 29.2 (SD 5.0) kg/m2, age = 45.8 (SD 11.5) years) provided body-weight data by smart scale (Fitbit Aria 2) over 18 months. Variability in body weight was calculated by linear and non-linear methods over the first 6, 9 and 12 weeks. These estimates were used to predict percentage weight change at 6, 12, and 18 months using both crude and adjusted multiple linear regression models.RESULTS: Greater non-linear weight variability over the first 6, 9 and 12 weeks was associated with increased subsequent weight in all comparisons; as was greater linear weight variability measured over 12 weeks (up to AdjR2 = 4.7%). Following adjustment, 6-week weight variability did not predict weight change in any model, though greater 9-week weight variability by non-linear methods was associated with increased body-weight change at 12 (∆AdjR2 = 1.2%) and 18 months (∆AdjR2 = 1.3%) and by linear methods at 18 months (∆AdjR2 = 1.1%). Greater non-linear weight variability measured over 12 weeks was associated with increased weight at 12 (∆AdjR2 = 1.4%) and 18 (∆AdjR2 = 2.2%) months; and 12-week linear variability was associated with increased weight at 12 (∆AdjR2 = 2.1%) and 18 (∆AdjR2 = 3.6%) months.CONCLUSION: Body-weight variability over the first 9 and 12 weeks of a weight-loss maintenance intervention weakly predicted increased weight at 12 and 18 months. These results suggest a potentially important role in continuously measuring body weight and estimating weight variability.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85094956841&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/s41366-020-00706-0

DO - 10.1038/s41366-020-00706-0

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33144700

VL - 45

SP - 525

EP - 534

JO - International Journal of Obesity

JF - International Journal of Obesity

SN - 0307-0565

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 65747984