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The Effect of Psychosocial Work Factors on Headache: Results From the PRISME Cohort Study

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Urhammer, Caroline ; Grynderup, Matias Brødsgaard ; Appel, Andreas Moses ; Hansen, Åse Marie ; Hansen, Jakob Møller ; Kaerlev, Linda ; Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten. / The Effect of Psychosocial Work Factors on Headache : Results From the PRISME Cohort Study. I: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2020 ; Bind 62, Nr. 11. s. e636-e643.

Bibtex

@article{6f96354686ab44d39ecfe8fc675d7b8c,
title = "The Effect of Psychosocial Work Factors on Headache: Results From the PRISME Cohort Study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To investigate the cross-sectional and longitudinal association between psychosocial work factors, assessed as work-unit averages, and headache. For comparison, we also applied individual exposure measures.METHODS: We used questionnaire-data on headache and psychosocial work factors (PWF). In total, 2247 employees were included in the cross-sectional analyses and 553 in the longitudinal analyses using work-unit averages. The corresponding numbers for the analyses using individual exposure measures were 4261 and 942 employees.RESULTS: Low skill discretion and low decision authority were most consistently associated with higher odds of headache across all analyses. Role conflicts, bullying, and effort-reward imbalance were associated with headache in some analyses. All PWF were associated with headache in cross-sectional analyses with individual exposure measures.CONCLUSION: This study partly supports the hypothesis of an effect of PWF, as a source of psychological stress, on the risk of headache.",
keywords = "distress, follow-up, migraine, stress, tension-type headache, working environment",
author = "Caroline Urhammer and Grynderup, {Matias Br{\o}dsgaard} and Appel, {Andreas Moses} and Hansen, {{\AA}se Marie} and Hansen, {Jakob M{\o}ller} and Linda Kaerlev and Kirsten Nabe-Nielsen",
year = "2020",
month = nov,
doi = "10.1097/JOM.0000000000002023",
language = "English",
volume = "62",
pages = "e636--e643",
journal = "Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine",
issn = "1076-2752",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins",
number = "11",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Effect of Psychosocial Work Factors on Headache

T2 - Results From the PRISME Cohort Study

AU - Urhammer, Caroline

AU - Grynderup, Matias Brødsgaard

AU - Appel, Andreas Moses

AU - Hansen, Åse Marie

AU - Hansen, Jakob Møller

AU - Kaerlev, Linda

AU - Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten

PY - 2020/11

Y1 - 2020/11

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the cross-sectional and longitudinal association between psychosocial work factors, assessed as work-unit averages, and headache. For comparison, we also applied individual exposure measures.METHODS: We used questionnaire-data on headache and psychosocial work factors (PWF). In total, 2247 employees were included in the cross-sectional analyses and 553 in the longitudinal analyses using work-unit averages. The corresponding numbers for the analyses using individual exposure measures were 4261 and 942 employees.RESULTS: Low skill discretion and low decision authority were most consistently associated with higher odds of headache across all analyses. Role conflicts, bullying, and effort-reward imbalance were associated with headache in some analyses. All PWF were associated with headache in cross-sectional analyses with individual exposure measures.CONCLUSION: This study partly supports the hypothesis of an effect of PWF, as a source of psychological stress, on the risk of headache.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the cross-sectional and longitudinal association between psychosocial work factors, assessed as work-unit averages, and headache. For comparison, we also applied individual exposure measures.METHODS: We used questionnaire-data on headache and psychosocial work factors (PWF). In total, 2247 employees were included in the cross-sectional analyses and 553 in the longitudinal analyses using work-unit averages. The corresponding numbers for the analyses using individual exposure measures were 4261 and 942 employees.RESULTS: Low skill discretion and low decision authority were most consistently associated with higher odds of headache across all analyses. Role conflicts, bullying, and effort-reward imbalance were associated with headache in some analyses. All PWF were associated with headache in cross-sectional analyses with individual exposure measures.CONCLUSION: This study partly supports the hypothesis of an effect of PWF, as a source of psychological stress, on the risk of headache.

KW - distress

KW - follow-up

KW - migraine

KW - stress

KW - tension-type headache

KW - working environment

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85095461929&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/JOM.0000000000002023

DO - 10.1097/JOM.0000000000002023

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32956234

VL - 62

SP - e636-e643

JO - Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

JF - Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

SN - 1076-2752

IS - 11

ER -

ID: 61822209