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The combined effect of body size and temperature on oxygen consumption rates and the size-dependency of preferred temperature in European perch Perca fluviatilis

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@article{6d4a18c4331c470faece60a54fc59fd7,
title = "The combined effect of body size and temperature on oxygen consumption rates and the size-dependency of preferred temperature in European perch Perca fluviatilis",
abstract = "The present study determined the effect of body mass and acclimation temperature (15-28°C) on oxygen consumption rate (ṀO 2 ) and the size dependency of preferred temperature in European perch Perca fluviatilis. Standard metabolic rate (SMR) scaled allometrically with body mass by an exponent of 0.86, and temperature influenced SMR with a Q 10 of 1.9 regardless of size. Maximum metabolic rate (MMR) and aerobic scope (MMR-SMR) scaled allometrically with body mass by exponents of 0.75-0.88. The mass scaling exponents of MMR and aerobic scope changed with temperature and were lowest at the highest temperature. Consequently, the optimal temperature for aerobic scope decreased with increasing body mass. Notably, fish <40 g did not show a decrease aerobic scope with increasing temperature. Factorial aerobic scope (MMR × SMR -1 ) generally decreased with increasing temperatures, was unaffected by size at the lower temperatures, and scaled negatively with body mass at the highest temperature. Similar to the optimal temperature for aerobic scope, preferred temperature declined with increasing body mass, unaffectedly by acclimation temperature. The present study indicates a limitation in the capacity for oxygen uptake in larger fish at high temperatures. A constraint in oxygen uptake at high temperature may restrict the growth of larger fish with environmental warming, at least if food availability is not limited. Furthermore, behavioural thermoregulation may be contributing to regional changes in the size distribution of fish in the wild caused by global warming as larger individuals will prefer colder water at higher latitudes and at larger depths than smaller conspecifics with increasing environmental temperatures. ",
keywords = "Acclimatization, Animals, Body Size, Global Warming, Oxygen Consumption/physiology, Perches/metabolism, Temperature",
author = "Christensen, {Emil A.F.} and Svendsen, {Morten B.S.} and Steffensen, {John F.}",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2020 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.",
year = "2020",
month = sep,
doi = "10.1111/jfb.14435",
language = "English",
volume = "97",
pages = "794--803",
journal = "Journal of Fish Biology",
issn = "0022-1112",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The combined effect of body size and temperature on oxygen consumption rates and the size-dependency of preferred temperature in European perch Perca fluviatilis

AU - Christensen, Emil A.F.

AU - Svendsen, Morten B.S.

AU - Steffensen, John F.

N1 - © 2020 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

PY - 2020/9

Y1 - 2020/9

N2 - The present study determined the effect of body mass and acclimation temperature (15-28°C) on oxygen consumption rate (ṀO 2 ) and the size dependency of preferred temperature in European perch Perca fluviatilis. Standard metabolic rate (SMR) scaled allometrically with body mass by an exponent of 0.86, and temperature influenced SMR with a Q 10 of 1.9 regardless of size. Maximum metabolic rate (MMR) and aerobic scope (MMR-SMR) scaled allometrically with body mass by exponents of 0.75-0.88. The mass scaling exponents of MMR and aerobic scope changed with temperature and were lowest at the highest temperature. Consequently, the optimal temperature for aerobic scope decreased with increasing body mass. Notably, fish <40 g did not show a decrease aerobic scope with increasing temperature. Factorial aerobic scope (MMR × SMR -1 ) generally decreased with increasing temperatures, was unaffected by size at the lower temperatures, and scaled negatively with body mass at the highest temperature. Similar to the optimal temperature for aerobic scope, preferred temperature declined with increasing body mass, unaffectedly by acclimation temperature. The present study indicates a limitation in the capacity for oxygen uptake in larger fish at high temperatures. A constraint in oxygen uptake at high temperature may restrict the growth of larger fish with environmental warming, at least if food availability is not limited. Furthermore, behavioural thermoregulation may be contributing to regional changes in the size distribution of fish in the wild caused by global warming as larger individuals will prefer colder water at higher latitudes and at larger depths than smaller conspecifics with increasing environmental temperatures.

AB - The present study determined the effect of body mass and acclimation temperature (15-28°C) on oxygen consumption rate (ṀO 2 ) and the size dependency of preferred temperature in European perch Perca fluviatilis. Standard metabolic rate (SMR) scaled allometrically with body mass by an exponent of 0.86, and temperature influenced SMR with a Q 10 of 1.9 regardless of size. Maximum metabolic rate (MMR) and aerobic scope (MMR-SMR) scaled allometrically with body mass by exponents of 0.75-0.88. The mass scaling exponents of MMR and aerobic scope changed with temperature and were lowest at the highest temperature. Consequently, the optimal temperature for aerobic scope decreased with increasing body mass. Notably, fish <40 g did not show a decrease aerobic scope with increasing temperature. Factorial aerobic scope (MMR × SMR -1 ) generally decreased with increasing temperatures, was unaffected by size at the lower temperatures, and scaled negatively with body mass at the highest temperature. Similar to the optimal temperature for aerobic scope, preferred temperature declined with increasing body mass, unaffectedly by acclimation temperature. The present study indicates a limitation in the capacity for oxygen uptake in larger fish at high temperatures. A constraint in oxygen uptake at high temperature may restrict the growth of larger fish with environmental warming, at least if food availability is not limited. Furthermore, behavioural thermoregulation may be contributing to regional changes in the size distribution of fish in the wild caused by global warming as larger individuals will prefer colder water at higher latitudes and at larger depths than smaller conspecifics with increasing environmental temperatures.

KW - Acclimatization

KW - Animals

KW - Body Size

KW - Global Warming

KW - Oxygen Consumption/physiology

KW - Perches/metabolism

KW - Temperature

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85088979115&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/jfb.14435

DO - 10.1111/jfb.14435

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32557687

AN - SCOPUS:85088979115

VL - 97

SP - 794

EP - 803

JO - Journal of Fish Biology

JF - Journal of Fish Biology

SN - 0022-1112

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 60726791