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The combined effect of body size and temperature on oxygen consumption rates and the size-dependency of preferred temperature in European perch Perca fluviatilis

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DOI

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Vis graf over relationer

The present study determined the effect of body mass and acclimation temperature (15–28°C) on oxygen consumption rate (ṀO2) and the size dependency of preferred temperature in European perch Perca fluviatilis. Standard metabolic rate (SMR) scaled allometrically with body mass by an exponent of 0.86, and temperature influenced SMR with a Q10 of 1.9 regardless of size. Maximum metabolic rate (MMR) and aerobic scope (MMR-SMR) scaled allometrically with body mass by exponents of 0.75–0.88. The mass scaling exponents of MMR and aerobic scope changed with temperature and were lowest at the highest temperature. Consequently, the optimal temperature for aerobic scope decreased with increasing body mass. Notably, fish <40 g did not show a decrease aerobic scope with increasing temperature. Factorial aerobic scope (MMR × SMR−1) generally decreased with increasing temperatures, was unaffected by size at the lower temperatures, and scaled negatively with body mass at the highest temperature. Similar to the optimal temperature for aerobic scope, preferred temperature declined with increasing body mass, unaffectedly by acclimation temperature. The present study indicates a limitation in the capacity for oxygen uptake in larger fish at high temperatures. A constraint in oxygen uptake at high temperature may restrict the growth of larger fish with environmental warming, at least if food availability is not limited. Furthermore, behavioural thermoregulation may be contributing to regional changes in the size distribution of fish in the wild caused by global warming as larger individuals will prefer colder water at higher latitudes and at larger depths than smaller conspecifics with increasing environmental temperatures.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Fish Biology
ISSN0022-1112
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1 jan. 2020

ID: 60726791