Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

The Association between Social Engagement, Mild Cognitive Impairment and Falls among Older Primary Care Patients

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Differences in Acute Metabolic Responses to Bionic and Nonbionic Ambulation in Spinal Cord Injured Humans and Controls

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Harmonization of Databases: A Step for Advancing the Knowledge About Spinal Cord Injury

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Association of Physical Fitness With Fibromyalgia Severity in Women: The al-Ándalus Project

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Predictors of long term mortality in older people with hip fracture

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  • Lien T Quach
  • Rachel E Ward
  • Mette M Pedersen
  • Suzanne G Leveille
  • Laura Grande
  • David R Gagnon
  • Jonathan F Bean
Vis graf over relationer

OBJECTIVES: To examine associations between mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and falls among primary care patients, and to investigate whether social engagement (SE) modifies these associations.

DESIGN: Cross sectional analysis using baseline data from an observational cohort study.

SETTING: Primary care.

PARTICIPANTS: Community-dwelling older adults (N=430) at risk of mobility decline with a mean age of 76.6 years (range 65-96y).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The number of falls in the past year was reported at the baseline interview. MCI was identified using a cutoff of 1.5 SD below the age-adjusted mean on at least 2 of the standardized cognitive performance tests. SE (eg, keeping in touch with friends and family, volunteering, participating social activities…) was assessed with the Late Life Function and Disability Instrument, and required a score above the median value 49.5 out of 100.

RESULTS: MCI was present among 42% of participants and 42% reported at least 1 fall in the preceding year. Using generalized estimating equations, MCI was associated with a 77% greater rate of falls (P<.05). There was a statistically significant interaction between SE and MCI on the rate of falls (P<.01), such that at a high level of SE, MCI was not statistically associated with falls (P=.83). In participants with lower levels of SE, MCI is associated with 1.3 times greater rate of falls (P<.01).

CONCLUSIONS: While MCI is associated with a greater risk for falls, higher levels of SE may play a protective role.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Vol/bind100
Udgave nummer8
Sider (fra-til)1499-1505
Antal sider7
ISSN0003-9993
DOI
StatusUdgivet - aug. 2019

ID: 56739709