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Telemetric intracranial pressure monitoring in children

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

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PURPOSE: Repeated intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements are essential in treatment of patients with complex cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) disorders. These patients often have a long surgical history with numerous invasive lumbar or intracranial pressure monitoring sessions and/or ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt revisions. Telemetric ICP monitoring might be an advantageous tool in treatment of these patients. In this paper, we evaluate our experience with this technology in paediatric patients.

METHODS: During a 4-year period, we implanted telemetric ICP sensors (Raumedic NEUROVENT-P-tel) in 20 paediatric patients to minimise the number of future invasive procedures. Patients were diagnosed with hydrocephalus, idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) or an arachnoid cyst. Most patients (85%) had a VP shunt at the time of sensor implantation.

RESULTS: In total, 32 sensors were inserted in the 20 patients; the cause of re-implantation was technical malfunction of the implant. One sensor was explanted due to wound infection and one due to skin erosion. We experienced no complications directly related to the implantation/explantation procedures. A total of 149 recording sessions were conducted, including 68 home monitoring sessions. The median implantation period was 523 days with a median duration of clinical use at 202 days. The most likely consequence of a recording session was non-surgical treatment alteration (shunt valve adjustment or acetazolamide dose adjustment).

CONCLUSION: Telemetric ICP monitoring in children is safe and potentially decreases the number of invasive procedures. We find that telemetric ICP monitoring aids the clinical management of patients with complex CSF disorders and improves everyday life for both patient and parents. It allows continuous ICP measurement in the patient's home and thereby potentially reducing hospitalisations, leading to significant cost savings.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftChild's nervous system : ChNS : official journal of the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery
Vol/bind36
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)49-58
ISSN0256-7040
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2020

ID: 58306800