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T-cell immunity against cytomegalovirus in HIV infection and aging: relationships with inflammation, immune activation, and frailty

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

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@article{5f3622586d174ab89022e35abc45b57d,
title = "T-cell immunity against cytomegalovirus in HIV infection and aging: relationships with inflammation, immune activation, and frailty",
abstract = "Both aging and treated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are characterized by low-level chronic inflammation and immune activation which contribute to the development of age-related diseases, frailty, and early mortality. Chronic cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is highly prevalent in older adults and HIV-infected populations. A number of studies have shown that CMV induces broad and strong T-cell responses in CMV-seropositive older adults and HIV-infected individuals. CMV infection rarely develops into clinical disease in immunocompetent individuals. However, a large body of literature has shown adverse effects of chronic CMV infection on the health and longevity of these populations. It has been hypothesized that chronic CMV infection may be a driver of chronic inflammation and immune activation, and may further contribute to the development of frailty. Thus, there is a need to better understand the extent of the impact of chronic CMV infection on T-cell immunity and health in aging and HIV infection. In this review, we will address important considerations and challenges in the assessment of chronic CMV infection and CMV-specific T-cell responses. We will then review recent data on relationships between T-cell responses to CMV and levels of inflammatory markers and immune activation, as well as the onset of frailty.",
keywords = "Aging, CLIP, Cytomegalovirus, Frailty, HIV infection, Immune activation",
author = "Juliette Tavenier and Margolick, {Joseph B} and Leng, {Sean X}",
year = "2019",
month = aug,
doi = "10.1007/s00430-019-00591-z",
language = "English",
volume = "208",
pages = "289--294",
journal = "Medical Microbiology and Immunology",
issn = "0300-8584",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "3-4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - T-cell immunity against cytomegalovirus in HIV infection and aging

T2 - relationships with inflammation, immune activation, and frailty

AU - Tavenier, Juliette

AU - Margolick, Joseph B

AU - Leng, Sean X

PY - 2019/8

Y1 - 2019/8

N2 - Both aging and treated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are characterized by low-level chronic inflammation and immune activation which contribute to the development of age-related diseases, frailty, and early mortality. Chronic cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is highly prevalent in older adults and HIV-infected populations. A number of studies have shown that CMV induces broad and strong T-cell responses in CMV-seropositive older adults and HIV-infected individuals. CMV infection rarely develops into clinical disease in immunocompetent individuals. However, a large body of literature has shown adverse effects of chronic CMV infection on the health and longevity of these populations. It has been hypothesized that chronic CMV infection may be a driver of chronic inflammation and immune activation, and may further contribute to the development of frailty. Thus, there is a need to better understand the extent of the impact of chronic CMV infection on T-cell immunity and health in aging and HIV infection. In this review, we will address important considerations and challenges in the assessment of chronic CMV infection and CMV-specific T-cell responses. We will then review recent data on relationships between T-cell responses to CMV and levels of inflammatory markers and immune activation, as well as the onset of frailty.

AB - Both aging and treated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are characterized by low-level chronic inflammation and immune activation which contribute to the development of age-related diseases, frailty, and early mortality. Chronic cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is highly prevalent in older adults and HIV-infected populations. A number of studies have shown that CMV induces broad and strong T-cell responses in CMV-seropositive older adults and HIV-infected individuals. CMV infection rarely develops into clinical disease in immunocompetent individuals. However, a large body of literature has shown adverse effects of chronic CMV infection on the health and longevity of these populations. It has been hypothesized that chronic CMV infection may be a driver of chronic inflammation and immune activation, and may further contribute to the development of frailty. Thus, there is a need to better understand the extent of the impact of chronic CMV infection on T-cell immunity and health in aging and HIV infection. In this review, we will address important considerations and challenges in the assessment of chronic CMV infection and CMV-specific T-cell responses. We will then review recent data on relationships between T-cell responses to CMV and levels of inflammatory markers and immune activation, as well as the onset of frailty.

KW - Aging

KW - CLIP

KW - Cytomegalovirus

KW - Frailty

KW - HIV infection

KW - Immune activation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85063136407&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00430-019-00591-z

DO - 10.1007/s00430-019-00591-z

M3 - Review

C2 - 30900090

VL - 208

SP - 289

EP - 294

JO - Medical Microbiology and Immunology

JF - Medical Microbiology and Immunology

SN - 0300-8584

IS - 3-4

ER -

ID: 56892117