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Systematic review: does endocrine therapy prolong survival in patients with prostate cancer?

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@article{3bf5f316412144548e9c4d2df4ec475b,
title = "Systematic review: does endocrine therapy prolong survival in patients with prostate cancer?",
abstract = "Objective Primary androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) remains the gold standard in the management of patients with advanced prostate cancer (PCa). ADT relieves symptoms and reduces tumor burden, but it has never been demonstrated to increase either PCa-specific or overall survival per se. Several trials have challenged this dogma. The aim of this study was to evaluate how endocrine therapy (ET) affects survival in different clinical settings of PCa. Materials and methods A review of published phase II, III and IV studies evaluating the effect of ET on survival was performed. Results In localized and locally advanced non-metastatic PCa, neoadjuvant ET before radical prostatectomy has no effect on survival. Neoadjuvant and adjuvant ET in combination with curatively intended radiotherapy results in PCa-specific and overall survival benefit, although the duration of ET remains under debate. In N + disease, the timing of ET is under debate, although data suggest that early ET is associated with decreased PCa-specific and overall mortality. In M + disease, no proper randomized trials have been performed in patients with newly diagnosed M1 disease. In metastatic castration-resistant PCa, two novel endocrine agents have been proven to increase overall survival significantly compared to placebo. Conclusions ET has never been proven to increase survival in newly diagnosed metastatic PCa in a randomized clinical trial. Nonetheless, a number of trials supports that ET with proper timing, sequencing and in combination with other therapeutic modalities increases survival in several stages of PCa.",
author = "Helgstrand, {John Thomas} and Berg, {Kasper Drimer} and Solvej Lippert and Klaus Brasso and R{\o}der, {Martin Andreas}",
year = "2016",
month = "6",
doi = "10.3109/21681805.2016.1142472",
language = "English",
volume = "50",
pages = "135--43",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Urology",
issn = "2168-1805",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Systematic review: does endocrine therapy prolong survival in patients with prostate cancer?

AU - Helgstrand, John Thomas

AU - Berg, Kasper Drimer

AU - Lippert, Solvej

AU - Brasso, Klaus

AU - Røder, Martin Andreas

PY - 2016/6

Y1 - 2016/6

N2 - Objective Primary androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) remains the gold standard in the management of patients with advanced prostate cancer (PCa). ADT relieves symptoms and reduces tumor burden, but it has never been demonstrated to increase either PCa-specific or overall survival per se. Several trials have challenged this dogma. The aim of this study was to evaluate how endocrine therapy (ET) affects survival in different clinical settings of PCa. Materials and methods A review of published phase II, III and IV studies evaluating the effect of ET on survival was performed. Results In localized and locally advanced non-metastatic PCa, neoadjuvant ET before radical prostatectomy has no effect on survival. Neoadjuvant and adjuvant ET in combination with curatively intended radiotherapy results in PCa-specific and overall survival benefit, although the duration of ET remains under debate. In N + disease, the timing of ET is under debate, although data suggest that early ET is associated with decreased PCa-specific and overall mortality. In M + disease, no proper randomized trials have been performed in patients with newly diagnosed M1 disease. In metastatic castration-resistant PCa, two novel endocrine agents have been proven to increase overall survival significantly compared to placebo. Conclusions ET has never been proven to increase survival in newly diagnosed metastatic PCa in a randomized clinical trial. Nonetheless, a number of trials supports that ET with proper timing, sequencing and in combination with other therapeutic modalities increases survival in several stages of PCa.

AB - Objective Primary androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) remains the gold standard in the management of patients with advanced prostate cancer (PCa). ADT relieves symptoms and reduces tumor burden, but it has never been demonstrated to increase either PCa-specific or overall survival per se. Several trials have challenged this dogma. The aim of this study was to evaluate how endocrine therapy (ET) affects survival in different clinical settings of PCa. Materials and methods A review of published phase II, III and IV studies evaluating the effect of ET on survival was performed. Results In localized and locally advanced non-metastatic PCa, neoadjuvant ET before radical prostatectomy has no effect on survival. Neoadjuvant and adjuvant ET in combination with curatively intended radiotherapy results in PCa-specific and overall survival benefit, although the duration of ET remains under debate. In N + disease, the timing of ET is under debate, although data suggest that early ET is associated with decreased PCa-specific and overall mortality. In M + disease, no proper randomized trials have been performed in patients with newly diagnosed M1 disease. In metastatic castration-resistant PCa, two novel endocrine agents have been proven to increase overall survival significantly compared to placebo. Conclusions ET has never been proven to increase survival in newly diagnosed metastatic PCa in a randomized clinical trial. Nonetheless, a number of trials supports that ET with proper timing, sequencing and in combination with other therapeutic modalities increases survival in several stages of PCa.

U2 - 10.3109/21681805.2016.1142472

DO - 10.3109/21681805.2016.1142472

M3 - Journal article

VL - 50

SP - 135

EP - 143

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Urology

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Urology

SN - 2168-1805

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 46295562