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Subcutaneous blood flow in man during sleep with continous epdural anaesthesia

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BACKGROUND: Subcutaneous blood flow increases during sleep and we evaluated if this increase is affected by epidural anaesthesia. METHODS: Lower leg subcutaneous blood flow was determined by 133Xenon clearance in ten subjects during continous epidural anaesthesia at L2-L3 including eight hours of sleep, while the opper abdominal subcutaneous blood flow served as control. RESULTS: Epidural anaesthesia to the level of the umbilicus was followed by an increase in the lower leg subcutaneous blood flow fra 3.4 (1.8-6.3) to 7.8 (3.6-16.9) ml min-1 (median and range; P<0.001) and returned to 3.5 (2.4-7.6) ml min-1 100 g-1 after 88 (45-123) min. In contrast, until the period of sleep the upper abdominal region blood flow remained at 5.2 (3.2-6.4) ml min-1 100 g-1. During sleep, lower leg subcutaneous blood flow did not change significantly, but the upper abdominal flow increased to 6.2 (5.2-7.2) ml min-1 100 g-1 after 34 (29-70) min (P<0.01), and it remained elevated for 125 (100-164) min. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that althrough epidural anaesthesia induced only a temporary increase in lower leg subcutaneous blood flow, it hindered the rise in subcutaneous blood flow normally manifest during early sleep.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftActa Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
Sider (fra-til)636-40
Antal sider5
ISSN0001-5172
StatusUdgivet - 1996

ID: 44338752