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Socioeconomic position and one-year mortality risk among patients with heart failure: A nationwide register-based cohort study

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AIMS: We sought to determine whether socioeconomic position affects the survival of patients with heart failure treated in a national healthcare system.

METHODS: We linked national Danish registers, identified 145,690 patients with new-onset heart failure between 2000 and 2015, and obtained information on education and income levels. We analysed differences in survival by income quartile and educational level using multiple Cox regression, stratified by sex. We standardised one-year mortality risks according to income level by age, year of diagnosis, cohabitation status, educational level, comorbidities and medical treatment of all patients. We standardised one-year mortality risk according to educational level by age and year of diagnosis.

RESULTS: One-year mortality was inversely related to income. In women the standardised average one-year mortality risk was 28.0% in the lowest income quartile and 24.3% in the highest income quartile, a risk difference of -3.8% (95% confidence interval (CI) -4.9% to -2.6%). In men the standardised one-year mortality risk was 26.1% in the lowest income quartile and 20.2% in the highest income quartile, a risk difference of -5.8% (95% CI -6.8% to -4.9%). Similar gradients in standardised mortality were present between the highest and lowest educational levels: -6.6% (95% CI -9.6% to -3.5%) among women and -5.0% (95% CI -6.3% to -3.7%) among men.

CONCLUSIONS: Income and educational level affect the survival of patients with heart failure, even in a national health system. Research is needed to investigate how socioeconomic differences affect survival.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean journal of preventive cardiology
Vol/bind27
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)79-88
ISSN2047-4873
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jan. 2020

ID: 57655438