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SOCIO-ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES OF TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY: A DANISH NATIONWIDE REGISTER-BASED STUDY

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@article{908d5bfda1ad42dcb37238881f37b7a8,
title = "SOCIO-ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES OF TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY: A DANISH NATIONWIDE REGISTER-BASED STUDY",
abstract = "This study examined if acquiring a traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases utilization of health care costs, increases risk of job loss for the patient and the closest relatives, and increases the risk of divorce 1 to 5 years following the injury. The study was conducted as a Danish national population-based register study with follow-up. Participants included a cohort of patients with TBI ( n  = 18,328) admitted to a hospital or treated in an emergency room (ER) and a matching control group ( n  = 89,155). For both the TBI group and the matching controls, relatives were identified, using national registers (TBI relatives: n  = 25,708 and control relatives: n  = 135,325). The outcome measures were utilization of health care costs (including hospital services, use of general practitioner and practicing specialists, and prescribed medication), risk of job loss, and risk of divorce among the TBI group and the control group and their relatives. Patients with TBI had significantly increased health care costs at baseline (i.e., the year before the injury) and during the following 4 years. Further, TBI relatives had a significantly higher utilization of health care costs the first and the third year after injury. The TBI group had a significant increased risk of job loss (odds ratio [OR] = 2.88; confidence interval [CI]: 2.70-3.07) and divorce (OR = 1.44; CI: 1.27-1.64) during the first 3 years following injury. In conclusion, the TBI group had significantly higher utilization of health care costs, both pre-morbidly and post-injury. Further, increased risk of job loss and divorce were found, emphasizing that the socioeconomic consequences of TBI last for years post-injury. ",
author = "Anne Norup and Marie Kruse and Soendergaard, {Pernille Langer} and Rasmussen, {Katrine Winther} and Fin Biering-S{\o}rensen",
year = "2020",
month = dec,
day = "15",
doi = "10.1089/neu.2020.7064",
language = "English",
volume = "37",
pages = "2694--2702",
journal = "Journal of Neurotrauma",
issn = "0897-7151",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "24",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - SOCIO-ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES OF TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

T2 - A DANISH NATIONWIDE REGISTER-BASED STUDY

AU - Norup, Anne

AU - Kruse, Marie

AU - Soendergaard, Pernille Langer

AU - Rasmussen, Katrine Winther

AU - Biering-Sørensen, Fin

PY - 2020/12/15

Y1 - 2020/12/15

N2 - This study examined if acquiring a traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases utilization of health care costs, increases risk of job loss for the patient and the closest relatives, and increases the risk of divorce 1 to 5 years following the injury. The study was conducted as a Danish national population-based register study with follow-up. Participants included a cohort of patients with TBI ( n  = 18,328) admitted to a hospital or treated in an emergency room (ER) and a matching control group ( n  = 89,155). For both the TBI group and the matching controls, relatives were identified, using national registers (TBI relatives: n  = 25,708 and control relatives: n  = 135,325). The outcome measures were utilization of health care costs (including hospital services, use of general practitioner and practicing specialists, and prescribed medication), risk of job loss, and risk of divorce among the TBI group and the control group and their relatives. Patients with TBI had significantly increased health care costs at baseline (i.e., the year before the injury) and during the following 4 years. Further, TBI relatives had a significantly higher utilization of health care costs the first and the third year after injury. The TBI group had a significant increased risk of job loss (odds ratio [OR] = 2.88; confidence interval [CI]: 2.70-3.07) and divorce (OR = 1.44; CI: 1.27-1.64) during the first 3 years following injury. In conclusion, the TBI group had significantly higher utilization of health care costs, both pre-morbidly and post-injury. Further, increased risk of job loss and divorce were found, emphasizing that the socioeconomic consequences of TBI last for years post-injury.

AB - This study examined if acquiring a traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases utilization of health care costs, increases risk of job loss for the patient and the closest relatives, and increases the risk of divorce 1 to 5 years following the injury. The study was conducted as a Danish national population-based register study with follow-up. Participants included a cohort of patients with TBI ( n  = 18,328) admitted to a hospital or treated in an emergency room (ER) and a matching control group ( n  = 89,155). For both the TBI group and the matching controls, relatives were identified, using national registers (TBI relatives: n  = 25,708 and control relatives: n  = 135,325). The outcome measures were utilization of health care costs (including hospital services, use of general practitioner and practicing specialists, and prescribed medication), risk of job loss, and risk of divorce among the TBI group and the control group and their relatives. Patients with TBI had significantly increased health care costs at baseline (i.e., the year before the injury) and during the following 4 years. Further, TBI relatives had a significantly higher utilization of health care costs the first and the third year after injury. The TBI group had a significant increased risk of job loss (odds ratio [OR] = 2.88; confidence interval [CI]: 2.70-3.07) and divorce (OR = 1.44; CI: 1.27-1.64) during the first 3 years following injury. In conclusion, the TBI group had significantly higher utilization of health care costs, both pre-morbidly and post-injury. Further, increased risk of job loss and divorce were found, emphasizing that the socioeconomic consequences of TBI last for years post-injury.

U2 - 10.1089/neu.2020.7064

DO - 10.1089/neu.2020.7064

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32808586

VL - 37

SP - 2694

EP - 2702

JO - Journal of Neurotrauma

JF - Journal of Neurotrauma

SN - 0897-7151

IS - 24

ER -

ID: 60707546