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Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
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Social disparities in children's exposure to second hand smoke at home: a repeated cross-sectional survey

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ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Exposure to second hand smoke (SHS) is an important preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in children. We hypothesise that there has been a growth in social inequality in children's exposure to SHS at home over time. The purpose of this study was to investigate temporal change in smoking in homes including children, focusing on the socioeconomic differences. METHODS: Data is from a repeated cross-sectional survey, 'Health Profiles of the Capital Region of Denmark' conducted in 2007 and 2010, in 29 municipalities. The response rate was 52.3%, in both surveys. Our study included persons aged 25 to 64, living with children [less than or equal to]15 years of age; N=9,289 in 2007 and 12,696 in 2010. Analyses were weighted for size of municipality and for non-response, which was higher among men and among persons who were younger, had a lower income, were living alone, were unemployed, and/or were of an ethnicity other than Danish. Regression analyses were used to investigate smoking in homes including children across parent/adult education levels, focusing on temporal changes. RESULTS: There were significant large socioeconomic differences in both 2007 and 2010. In 2010 it was more than 11 times more likely for a child to be exposed to SHS at home if the parent had very low education than if they were highly educated (p
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEnvironmental Health: A Global Access Science Source
Vol/bind11
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)65
ISSN1476-069X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2012

ID: 36523659