Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Smoking reduces circulating CD26hiCD161hi MAIT cells in healthy individuals and patients with multiple sclerosis

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{1fb3e8563b744bf0bff48a45f9bed794,
title = "Smoking reduces circulating CD26hiCD161hi MAIT cells in healthy individuals and patients with multiple sclerosis",
abstract = "Upon chronic cigarette smoke exposure, inhaled antigens and irritants cause altered lung immune homeostasis. Circulating immune cells are affected, and smoking is associated with an increased risk of developing various disorders, including multiple sclerosis (MS). This study was conducted to determine the impact of smoking on circulating immune cell subsets. Furthermore, we determined whether any smoking-associated changes were related to MS. With the use of flow cytometry, CFSE assays, and ELISpot assays, we analyzed circulating immune cell phenotypes and quantified antigen-induced proliferation and cytokine secretion in smokers and nonsmokers in a cohort of 100 healthy individuals (HI). In addition, we analyzed immune cell subsets associated with smoking in 2 independent cohorts of patients with MS. In HI smokers compared with nonsmokers, we found increased blood cell counts of granulocytes, monocytes, and lymphocytes. These cells were not more proinflammatory, autoreactive, or EBV reactive compared with cells from nonsmokers. Phenotypic differences were seen in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and CD8+ T cells as higher percentages of ICOS ligand (ICOSL)+ pDCs and lower percentages of CD26hiCD161hi CD8+ T cells and CCR6+ CD8+ T cells in smokers compared with nonsmokers. In supplemental analyses, we showed that CD26hiCD161hi CD8+ T cells were mainly mucosal-associated invariant T cells (MAITs). Comparable frequencies of ICOSL+ pDCs, CCR6+ CD8+ T cells, and CD26hiCD161hi CD8+ T cells were found between HI and MS patients who were nonsmokers. Our findings suggest general proinflammatory effects from smoking combined with skewing of specific cell populations in HI and MS patients. The function of these cell populations needs further investigation.",
keywords = "Adult, CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Cell Count, Cohort Studies, Cotinine, Dendritic Cells, Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Granulocytes, Humans, Immunophenotyping, Inducible T-Cell Co-Stimulator Ligand, Male, Middle Aged, Monocytes, Multiple Sclerosis, NK Cell Lectin-Like Receptor Subfamily B, Primary Cell Culture, Smoking, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't",
author = "Cecilie Ammitzb{\o}ll and Lars B{\"o}rnsen and {Romme Christensen}, Jeppe and Rikke Ratzer and {Romme Nielsen}, Birgitte and S{\o}ndergaard, {Helle B} and {von Essen}, {Marina R} and Finn Sellebjerg",
note = "{\circledC} Society for Leukocyte Biology.",
year = "2017",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1189/jlb.3A0616-267R",
language = "English",
volume = "101",
pages = "1211--1220",
journal = "Journal of Leukocyte Biology",
issn = "0741-5400",
publisher = "Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Smoking reduces circulating CD26hiCD161hi MAIT cells in healthy individuals and patients with multiple sclerosis

AU - Ammitzbøll, Cecilie

AU - Börnsen, Lars

AU - Romme Christensen, Jeppe

AU - Ratzer, Rikke

AU - Romme Nielsen, Birgitte

AU - Søndergaard, Helle B

AU - von Essen, Marina R

AU - Sellebjerg, Finn

N1 - © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

PY - 2017/5

Y1 - 2017/5

N2 - Upon chronic cigarette smoke exposure, inhaled antigens and irritants cause altered lung immune homeostasis. Circulating immune cells are affected, and smoking is associated with an increased risk of developing various disorders, including multiple sclerosis (MS). This study was conducted to determine the impact of smoking on circulating immune cell subsets. Furthermore, we determined whether any smoking-associated changes were related to MS. With the use of flow cytometry, CFSE assays, and ELISpot assays, we analyzed circulating immune cell phenotypes and quantified antigen-induced proliferation and cytokine secretion in smokers and nonsmokers in a cohort of 100 healthy individuals (HI). In addition, we analyzed immune cell subsets associated with smoking in 2 independent cohorts of patients with MS. In HI smokers compared with nonsmokers, we found increased blood cell counts of granulocytes, monocytes, and lymphocytes. These cells were not more proinflammatory, autoreactive, or EBV reactive compared with cells from nonsmokers. Phenotypic differences were seen in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and CD8+ T cells as higher percentages of ICOS ligand (ICOSL)+ pDCs and lower percentages of CD26hiCD161hi CD8+ T cells and CCR6+ CD8+ T cells in smokers compared with nonsmokers. In supplemental analyses, we showed that CD26hiCD161hi CD8+ T cells were mainly mucosal-associated invariant T cells (MAITs). Comparable frequencies of ICOSL+ pDCs, CCR6+ CD8+ T cells, and CD26hiCD161hi CD8+ T cells were found between HI and MS patients who were nonsmokers. Our findings suggest general proinflammatory effects from smoking combined with skewing of specific cell populations in HI and MS patients. The function of these cell populations needs further investigation.

AB - Upon chronic cigarette smoke exposure, inhaled antigens and irritants cause altered lung immune homeostasis. Circulating immune cells are affected, and smoking is associated with an increased risk of developing various disorders, including multiple sclerosis (MS). This study was conducted to determine the impact of smoking on circulating immune cell subsets. Furthermore, we determined whether any smoking-associated changes were related to MS. With the use of flow cytometry, CFSE assays, and ELISpot assays, we analyzed circulating immune cell phenotypes and quantified antigen-induced proliferation and cytokine secretion in smokers and nonsmokers in a cohort of 100 healthy individuals (HI). In addition, we analyzed immune cell subsets associated with smoking in 2 independent cohorts of patients with MS. In HI smokers compared with nonsmokers, we found increased blood cell counts of granulocytes, monocytes, and lymphocytes. These cells were not more proinflammatory, autoreactive, or EBV reactive compared with cells from nonsmokers. Phenotypic differences were seen in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and CD8+ T cells as higher percentages of ICOS ligand (ICOSL)+ pDCs and lower percentages of CD26hiCD161hi CD8+ T cells and CCR6+ CD8+ T cells in smokers compared with nonsmokers. In supplemental analyses, we showed that CD26hiCD161hi CD8+ T cells were mainly mucosal-associated invariant T cells (MAITs). Comparable frequencies of ICOSL+ pDCs, CCR6+ CD8+ T cells, and CD26hiCD161hi CD8+ T cells were found between HI and MS patients who were nonsmokers. Our findings suggest general proinflammatory effects from smoking combined with skewing of specific cell populations in HI and MS patients. The function of these cell populations needs further investigation.

KW - Adult

KW - CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes

KW - Cell Count

KW - Cohort Studies

KW - Cotinine

KW - Dendritic Cells

KW - Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4

KW - Female

KW - Gene Expression Regulation

KW - Granulocytes

KW - Humans

KW - Immunophenotyping

KW - Inducible T-Cell Co-Stimulator Ligand

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Monocytes

KW - Multiple Sclerosis

KW - NK Cell Lectin-Like Receptor Subfamily B

KW - Primary Cell Culture

KW - Smoking

KW - Journal Article

KW - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

U2 - 10.1189/jlb.3A0616-267R

DO - 10.1189/jlb.3A0616-267R

M3 - Journal article

VL - 101

SP - 1211

EP - 1220

JO - Journal of Leukocyte Biology

JF - Journal of Leukocyte Biology

SN - 0741-5400

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 52217022