Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
E-pub ahead of print

Severe hypocalcemia due to hypoparathyroidism associated with HIV: A case report

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{c7fbfb54d8b443bda780ed4132023b2a,
title = "Severe hypocalcemia due to hypoparathyroidism associated with HIV: A case report",
abstract = "Calcemia is not routinely determined among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In people living with HIV, the most frequent electrolyte disturbance is hyponatremia and since symptoms of hypocalcemia often are unspecific, calcium is typically measured with some delay. Hypocalcemia in people living with HIV is mainly due to indirect causes such as vitamin D deficiency, renal failure, or drug related. However, in rare cases direct viral involvement of the parathyroid glands has been reported. We present a case of a 67-year-old male living with HIV who presented at an emergency department with symptomatic severe hypocalcemia, without any previous history of neck surgery, radiation therapy or large infections in the head and neck area. At the time of admission serum concentrations were for ionized calcium 0.98 mmol/L (ref. 1.18-1.32 mmol/L) and PTH 1.3 mmol/L (ref. 2.0-8.5 pmol/L). Vitamin D status was sufficient with 25OHD at 73 nmol/L to 112 nmol/L (ref. 60-160 nmol/L) from 2016 through 2019. The patient was diagnosed with primary hypoparathyroidism and was treated with Alphacalcidol 0,5 μg × 1/daily, calcium 500 mg × 4 the first day followed by 400 mg × 2 and magnesium 360 mg × 3, which induced rapid clinical recovery with dissolvement of muscular pain and biochemical improvement. This case study suggests that further studies are needed to investigate the added value of routine monitoring for hypocalcemia as part of clinical follow-up of people living with HIV.",
keywords = "HIV, Human immunodeficiency virus, Hypocalcemia, Hypoparathyroidism, Vitamin D",
author = "Taran Gulden and Yahyavi, {Sam Kafai} and Lodding, {Isabelle Paula} and Jensen, {Jens-Erik Beck} and {Blomberg Jensen}, Martin",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2021 The Authors.",
year = "2021",
month = aug,
day = "20",
doi = "10.1016/j.bonr.2021.101119",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
journal = "Bone Reports",
issn = "2352-1872",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Severe hypocalcemia due to hypoparathyroidism associated with HIV

T2 - A case report

AU - Gulden, Taran

AU - Yahyavi, Sam Kafai

AU - Lodding, Isabelle Paula

AU - Jensen, Jens-Erik Beck

AU - Blomberg Jensen, Martin

N1 - © 2021 The Authors.

PY - 2021/8/20

Y1 - 2021/8/20

N2 - Calcemia is not routinely determined among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In people living with HIV, the most frequent electrolyte disturbance is hyponatremia and since symptoms of hypocalcemia often are unspecific, calcium is typically measured with some delay. Hypocalcemia in people living with HIV is mainly due to indirect causes such as vitamin D deficiency, renal failure, or drug related. However, in rare cases direct viral involvement of the parathyroid glands has been reported. We present a case of a 67-year-old male living with HIV who presented at an emergency department with symptomatic severe hypocalcemia, without any previous history of neck surgery, radiation therapy or large infections in the head and neck area. At the time of admission serum concentrations were for ionized calcium 0.98 mmol/L (ref. 1.18-1.32 mmol/L) and PTH 1.3 mmol/L (ref. 2.0-8.5 pmol/L). Vitamin D status was sufficient with 25OHD at 73 nmol/L to 112 nmol/L (ref. 60-160 nmol/L) from 2016 through 2019. The patient was diagnosed with primary hypoparathyroidism and was treated with Alphacalcidol 0,5 μg × 1/daily, calcium 500 mg × 4 the first day followed by 400 mg × 2 and magnesium 360 mg × 3, which induced rapid clinical recovery with dissolvement of muscular pain and biochemical improvement. This case study suggests that further studies are needed to investigate the added value of routine monitoring for hypocalcemia as part of clinical follow-up of people living with HIV.

AB - Calcemia is not routinely determined among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In people living with HIV, the most frequent electrolyte disturbance is hyponatremia and since symptoms of hypocalcemia often are unspecific, calcium is typically measured with some delay. Hypocalcemia in people living with HIV is mainly due to indirect causes such as vitamin D deficiency, renal failure, or drug related. However, in rare cases direct viral involvement of the parathyroid glands has been reported. We present a case of a 67-year-old male living with HIV who presented at an emergency department with symptomatic severe hypocalcemia, without any previous history of neck surgery, radiation therapy or large infections in the head and neck area. At the time of admission serum concentrations were for ionized calcium 0.98 mmol/L (ref. 1.18-1.32 mmol/L) and PTH 1.3 mmol/L (ref. 2.0-8.5 pmol/L). Vitamin D status was sufficient with 25OHD at 73 nmol/L to 112 nmol/L (ref. 60-160 nmol/L) from 2016 through 2019. The patient was diagnosed with primary hypoparathyroidism and was treated with Alphacalcidol 0,5 μg × 1/daily, calcium 500 mg × 4 the first day followed by 400 mg × 2 and magnesium 360 mg × 3, which induced rapid clinical recovery with dissolvement of muscular pain and biochemical improvement. This case study suggests that further studies are needed to investigate the added value of routine monitoring for hypocalcemia as part of clinical follow-up of people living with HIV.

KW - HIV

KW - Human immunodeficiency virus

KW - Hypocalcemia

KW - Hypoparathyroidism

KW - Vitamin D

U2 - 10.1016/j.bonr.2021.101119

DO - 10.1016/j.bonr.2021.101119

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34504905

VL - 15

JO - Bone Reports

JF - Bone Reports

SN - 2352-1872

M1 - 101119

ER -

ID: 67611238