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Secular trends in smoking in relation to prevalent and incident smoking-related disease: A prospective population-based study

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@article{7ed84aae2fba487cab6ab488424855a5,
title = "Secular trends in smoking in relation to prevalent and incident smoking-related disease: A prospective population-based study",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: We examined changes in smoking habits in the general population according to prevalence and incidence of chronic diseases affected by smoking.METHODS: We included 12283 individuals enrolled from 2003 in the Copenhagen General Population Study and re-examined from 2014. Participants were classified as either healthy or suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, diabetes mellitus, heart disease or stroke.RESULTS: At entry, smoking prevalence was 15.4% in healthy participants, 29.8% with COPD, 15.8% with asthma, 21.7 % with diabetes mellitus, 17.2 % with ischemic heart disease/heart failure and 18.6% in participants with previous stroke. Smoking prevalence declined during the 10 years of observation. Among healthy subjects who developed one of the above mentioned diseases during follow-up, those who developed COPD had the highest initial smoking prevalence (51.5%). Quit rates were highest in those who developed asthma resulting in smoking prevalence of 8.2% versus 27.7% in COPD. After adjustment for age, smoking severity and genotype previously associated with heavy smoking (CHRNA3 rs1051730 AA), significant predictors of quitting were new diagnosis of ischemic heart disease/heart failure (OR=2.33, 95 % CI: 1.61-3.42), new diagnosis of asthma (OR=1.84, 95% CI: 1.18-2.90) and low number of pack-years.CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with prevalent smoking related diseases continued to smoke more than healthy individuals. Incident heart disease and asthma, but not incident COPD, stroke or diabetes were associated with a higher chance of quitting. Special focus on smokers with COPD, asthma, diabetes, stroke and ischemic heart disease/heart failure is warranted to decrease smoking prevalence in these groups. Smokers with a new diagnosis of diabetes, stroke and COPD need special smoking cessation support.",
author = "Philip Tonnesen and Marott, {Jacob L} and B{\o}rge Nordestgaard and Bojesen, {Stig Egil} and Peter Lange",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2019 Tonnesen P.",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.18332/tid/112459",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "72",
journal = "Tobacco Induced Diseases (Online)",
issn = "1617-9625",
publisher = "BioMed Central Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Secular trends in smoking in relation to prevalent and incident smoking-related disease

T2 - A prospective population-based study

AU - Tonnesen, Philip

AU - Marott, Jacob L

AU - Nordestgaard, Børge

AU - Bojesen, Stig Egil

AU - Lange, Peter

N1 - © 2019 Tonnesen P.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - INTRODUCTION: We examined changes in smoking habits in the general population according to prevalence and incidence of chronic diseases affected by smoking.METHODS: We included 12283 individuals enrolled from 2003 in the Copenhagen General Population Study and re-examined from 2014. Participants were classified as either healthy or suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, diabetes mellitus, heart disease or stroke.RESULTS: At entry, smoking prevalence was 15.4% in healthy participants, 29.8% with COPD, 15.8% with asthma, 21.7 % with diabetes mellitus, 17.2 % with ischemic heart disease/heart failure and 18.6% in participants with previous stroke. Smoking prevalence declined during the 10 years of observation. Among healthy subjects who developed one of the above mentioned diseases during follow-up, those who developed COPD had the highest initial smoking prevalence (51.5%). Quit rates were highest in those who developed asthma resulting in smoking prevalence of 8.2% versus 27.7% in COPD. After adjustment for age, smoking severity and genotype previously associated with heavy smoking (CHRNA3 rs1051730 AA), significant predictors of quitting were new diagnosis of ischemic heart disease/heart failure (OR=2.33, 95 % CI: 1.61-3.42), new diagnosis of asthma (OR=1.84, 95% CI: 1.18-2.90) and low number of pack-years.CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with prevalent smoking related diseases continued to smoke more than healthy individuals. Incident heart disease and asthma, but not incident COPD, stroke or diabetes were associated with a higher chance of quitting. Special focus on smokers with COPD, asthma, diabetes, stroke and ischemic heart disease/heart failure is warranted to decrease smoking prevalence in these groups. Smokers with a new diagnosis of diabetes, stroke and COPD need special smoking cessation support.

AB - INTRODUCTION: We examined changes in smoking habits in the general population according to prevalence and incidence of chronic diseases affected by smoking.METHODS: We included 12283 individuals enrolled from 2003 in the Copenhagen General Population Study and re-examined from 2014. Participants were classified as either healthy or suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, diabetes mellitus, heart disease or stroke.RESULTS: At entry, smoking prevalence was 15.4% in healthy participants, 29.8% with COPD, 15.8% with asthma, 21.7 % with diabetes mellitus, 17.2 % with ischemic heart disease/heart failure and 18.6% in participants with previous stroke. Smoking prevalence declined during the 10 years of observation. Among healthy subjects who developed one of the above mentioned diseases during follow-up, those who developed COPD had the highest initial smoking prevalence (51.5%). Quit rates were highest in those who developed asthma resulting in smoking prevalence of 8.2% versus 27.7% in COPD. After adjustment for age, smoking severity and genotype previously associated with heavy smoking (CHRNA3 rs1051730 AA), significant predictors of quitting were new diagnosis of ischemic heart disease/heart failure (OR=2.33, 95 % CI: 1.61-3.42), new diagnosis of asthma (OR=1.84, 95% CI: 1.18-2.90) and low number of pack-years.CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with prevalent smoking related diseases continued to smoke more than healthy individuals. Incident heart disease and asthma, but not incident COPD, stroke or diabetes were associated with a higher chance of quitting. Special focus on smokers with COPD, asthma, diabetes, stroke and ischemic heart disease/heart failure is warranted to decrease smoking prevalence in these groups. Smokers with a new diagnosis of diabetes, stroke and COPD need special smoking cessation support.

U2 - 10.18332/tid/112459

DO - 10.18332/tid/112459

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31768164

VL - 17

SP - 72

JO - Tobacco Induced Diseases (Online)

JF - Tobacco Induced Diseases (Online)

SN - 1617-9625

ER -

ID: 59154133