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Scheduling appointments for postvasectomy semen analysis has no impact on compliance

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@article{25960cd44b3b4278887bf449c71ddd2c,
title = "Scheduling appointments for postvasectomy semen analysis has no impact on compliance",
abstract = "Background: A postvasectomy semen analysis (PVSA) is recommended 8–16 wk after vasectomy to ensure azoospermia. Patient compliance with submitting a semen sample for PVSA has historically been low. To increase patient compliance, a policy change was made to schedule patients for PVSA appointments instead of a previous “drop-in” option. Objective: To compare patient compliance for PVSA when scheduling appointments as opposed to a “drop-in” appointment 8–16 wk after the procedure. Design, setting, and participants: Ethical approval was obtained to retrospectively evaluate patients undergoing vasectomy. A total of 400 patients were evaluated, 200 consecutive patients before and 200 after the policy change. Patients were excluded from analysis if they had other surgeries at the same time of vasectomy or if the vasectomy was a repeat procedure. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: Percent of patients attending PVSA and time to PVSA were assessed. Nominal data were compared using chi-square analysis and interval data were compared using Student unpaired t test. Results and limitations: Thirteen patients were excluded from analysis: six before and seven after the policy change. Compliance rates were similar before and after the policy change (144/194 [74%] and 154/193 [80%], p = 0.19). There was no difference in the time from vasectomy to PVSA between groups (before: mean [standard deviation] 69 [55] d vs after: 74 (63) d, p = 0.44). This study is limited by its retrospective design. Conclusions: Scheduling appointments for PVSA has no impact on compliance rates or the time between vasectomy and semen analysis when compared with “drop-in” appointments. Patient summary: Sterility after a vasectomy is guaranteed by delivering a semen sample. Many men do not deliver this sample, and sterility cannot be guaranteed. This study found that scheduling appointments did not increase the number of men who delivered a semen sample compared with “drop-in” appointments.",
keywords = "Fertility, Patient compliance, Postvasectomy semen analysis, Semen analysis, Vasectomy",
author = "Jacobsen, {Frederik M{\o}ller} and Jensen, {Christian Fuglesang Skj{\o}dt} and Mikkel Fode and S{\o}nksen, {Jens Otto Reimers} and Ohl, {Dana A} and {CopMich Collaborative}",
year = "2020",
month = dec,
doi = "10.1016/j.euros.2020.10.006",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "74--78",
journal = "European Urology Open Science",
issn = "2666-1683",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Scheduling appointments for postvasectomy semen analysis has no impact on compliance

AU - Jacobsen, Frederik Møller

AU - Jensen, Christian Fuglesang Skjødt

AU - Fode , Mikkel

AU - Sønksen, Jens Otto Reimers

AU - Ohl, Dana A

AU - CopMich Collaborative

PY - 2020/12

Y1 - 2020/12

N2 - Background: A postvasectomy semen analysis (PVSA) is recommended 8–16 wk after vasectomy to ensure azoospermia. Patient compliance with submitting a semen sample for PVSA has historically been low. To increase patient compliance, a policy change was made to schedule patients for PVSA appointments instead of a previous “drop-in” option. Objective: To compare patient compliance for PVSA when scheduling appointments as opposed to a “drop-in” appointment 8–16 wk after the procedure. Design, setting, and participants: Ethical approval was obtained to retrospectively evaluate patients undergoing vasectomy. A total of 400 patients were evaluated, 200 consecutive patients before and 200 after the policy change. Patients were excluded from analysis if they had other surgeries at the same time of vasectomy or if the vasectomy was a repeat procedure. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: Percent of patients attending PVSA and time to PVSA were assessed. Nominal data were compared using chi-square analysis and interval data were compared using Student unpaired t test. Results and limitations: Thirteen patients were excluded from analysis: six before and seven after the policy change. Compliance rates were similar before and after the policy change (144/194 [74%] and 154/193 [80%], p = 0.19). There was no difference in the time from vasectomy to PVSA between groups (before: mean [standard deviation] 69 [55] d vs after: 74 (63) d, p = 0.44). This study is limited by its retrospective design. Conclusions: Scheduling appointments for PVSA has no impact on compliance rates or the time between vasectomy and semen analysis when compared with “drop-in” appointments. Patient summary: Sterility after a vasectomy is guaranteed by delivering a semen sample. Many men do not deliver this sample, and sterility cannot be guaranteed. This study found that scheduling appointments did not increase the number of men who delivered a semen sample compared with “drop-in” appointments.

AB - Background: A postvasectomy semen analysis (PVSA) is recommended 8–16 wk after vasectomy to ensure azoospermia. Patient compliance with submitting a semen sample for PVSA has historically been low. To increase patient compliance, a policy change was made to schedule patients for PVSA appointments instead of a previous “drop-in” option. Objective: To compare patient compliance for PVSA when scheduling appointments as opposed to a “drop-in” appointment 8–16 wk after the procedure. Design, setting, and participants: Ethical approval was obtained to retrospectively evaluate patients undergoing vasectomy. A total of 400 patients were evaluated, 200 consecutive patients before and 200 after the policy change. Patients were excluded from analysis if they had other surgeries at the same time of vasectomy or if the vasectomy was a repeat procedure. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: Percent of patients attending PVSA and time to PVSA were assessed. Nominal data were compared using chi-square analysis and interval data were compared using Student unpaired t test. Results and limitations: Thirteen patients were excluded from analysis: six before and seven after the policy change. Compliance rates were similar before and after the policy change (144/194 [74%] and 154/193 [80%], p = 0.19). There was no difference in the time from vasectomy to PVSA between groups (before: mean [standard deviation] 69 [55] d vs after: 74 (63) d, p = 0.44). This study is limited by its retrospective design. Conclusions: Scheduling appointments for PVSA has no impact on compliance rates or the time between vasectomy and semen analysis when compared with “drop-in” appointments. Patient summary: Sterility after a vasectomy is guaranteed by delivering a semen sample. Many men do not deliver this sample, and sterility cannot be guaranteed. This study found that scheduling appointments did not increase the number of men who delivered a semen sample compared with “drop-in” appointments.

KW - Fertility

KW - Patient compliance

KW - Postvasectomy semen analysis

KW - Semen analysis

KW - Vasectomy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85096961630&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.euros.2020.10.006

DO - 10.1016/j.euros.2020.10.006

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34337480

VL - 22

SP - 74

EP - 78

JO - European Urology Open Science

JF - European Urology Open Science

SN - 2666-1683

ER -

ID: 61854727