Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Risk factors associated with serum levels of the inflammatory biomarker soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor in a general population

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. suPAR Cut-Offs for Risk Stratification in Patients With Symptoms of COVID-19

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Circadian, Week-to-Week, and Physical Exercise-Induced Variation of Serum Microfibrillar-Associated Protein 4

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Plasma soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor in children with urinary tract infection

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. An Ethnographic study of unhealthy alcohol use in a Danish Emergency Department

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Linking Stressful Life Events and Chronic Inflammation Using suPAR (Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor)

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer

The soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a biomarker of mortality risk in various patient populations. However, little is known about the implications of lifestyle for suPAR levels in the general population. Lifestyle, demographic, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor data were collected from 5,538 participants in the Danish population-based Inter99 study. Their suPAR levels were measured using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the final adjusted model, smoking and morbid obesity were strongly associated with higher suPAR levels (P < 0.001). An unhealthy diet and alcohol abstinence in men were also associated with higher suPAR levels. Physical activity in leisure time had a modest impact on suPAR levels in univariate analysis, but not in the final adjusted model. In conclusion, smoking and morbid obesity were strongly associated with higher serum suPAR levels in this general population. Diet and alcohol consumption also seemed to impact suPAR levels. Lifestyle changes are likely to affect suPAR since ex-smokers had suPAR levels comparable to those of never-smokers.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftBiomarker Insights
Vol/bind9
Sider (fra-til)91-100
Antal sider10
ISSN1177-2719
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2014

ID: 44875257