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Representativeness in population-based studies: a detailed description of non-response in a Danish cohort study

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@article{e1a59552bc87495b83448b6980a6cbe0,
title = "Representativeness in population-based studies: a detailed description of non-response in a Danish cohort study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Decreasing rates of participation in population-based studies increasingly challenge the interpretation of study results, in both analytic and descriptive epidemiology. Consequently, estimates of possible differences between participants and non-participants are increasingly important for the interpretation of study results and generalization to the background population.METHODS: An age-specific, population-based cohort of 1,198 individuals was examined at age 40, 45, 51, and 60. Participants were compared with non-participants and when possible also with the background population using a wide range of detailed information on somatic and mental health collected at each examination, including data from a clinical examination, biochemical measurements, questionnaires, interviews, and public registers.RESULTS: Participation rates were higher than 80{\%} at examinations at age 40, 45, and 51, but decreased to 65{\%} at age 60. At the baseline investigation at age 40, analyses indicated that participants were representative of the cohort as well as the background population. However, the mortality rate was higher among non-participants in the succeeding 20 years. Among living cohort members at the 60-year examination, non-participants had lower socioeconomic status, higher hospitalization rate, and a worse overall health profile than participants.CONCLUSIONS: The detailed data presented reinforce the contention that the health profile of non-participants is typically worse than that of participants. The results also indicate that while data from public registers give easily accessible information about non-participants, these crude proxy measures of health may not be enough to document representativeness.",
keywords = "Adult, Cohort Studies, Data Collection, Denmark, Epidemiologic Methods, Follow-Up Studies, Health Surveys, Humans, Interviews as Topic, Middle Aged, Patient Participation, Population Surveillance, Prospective Studies, Socioeconomic Factors, Surveys and Questionnaires, Comparative Study, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't",
author = "Thomas Drivsholm and Eplov, {Lene Falgaard} and Michael Davidsen and Torben J{\o}rgensen and Hans Ibsen and Hanne Hollnagel and Knut Borch-Johnsen",
year = "2006",
doi = "10.1080/14034940600607616",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "623--31",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Public Health",
issn = "1403-4948",
publisher = "Sage Publications Ltd",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Representativeness in population-based studies

T2 - a detailed description of non-response in a Danish cohort study

AU - Drivsholm, Thomas

AU - Eplov, Lene Falgaard

AU - Davidsen, Michael

AU - Jørgensen, Torben

AU - Ibsen, Hans

AU - Hollnagel, Hanne

AU - Borch-Johnsen, Knut

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - BACKGROUND: Decreasing rates of participation in population-based studies increasingly challenge the interpretation of study results, in both analytic and descriptive epidemiology. Consequently, estimates of possible differences between participants and non-participants are increasingly important for the interpretation of study results and generalization to the background population.METHODS: An age-specific, population-based cohort of 1,198 individuals was examined at age 40, 45, 51, and 60. Participants were compared with non-participants and when possible also with the background population using a wide range of detailed information on somatic and mental health collected at each examination, including data from a clinical examination, biochemical measurements, questionnaires, interviews, and public registers.RESULTS: Participation rates were higher than 80% at examinations at age 40, 45, and 51, but decreased to 65% at age 60. At the baseline investigation at age 40, analyses indicated that participants were representative of the cohort as well as the background population. However, the mortality rate was higher among non-participants in the succeeding 20 years. Among living cohort members at the 60-year examination, non-participants had lower socioeconomic status, higher hospitalization rate, and a worse overall health profile than participants.CONCLUSIONS: The detailed data presented reinforce the contention that the health profile of non-participants is typically worse than that of participants. The results also indicate that while data from public registers give easily accessible information about non-participants, these crude proxy measures of health may not be enough to document representativeness.

AB - BACKGROUND: Decreasing rates of participation in population-based studies increasingly challenge the interpretation of study results, in both analytic and descriptive epidemiology. Consequently, estimates of possible differences between participants and non-participants are increasingly important for the interpretation of study results and generalization to the background population.METHODS: An age-specific, population-based cohort of 1,198 individuals was examined at age 40, 45, 51, and 60. Participants were compared with non-participants and when possible also with the background population using a wide range of detailed information on somatic and mental health collected at each examination, including data from a clinical examination, biochemical measurements, questionnaires, interviews, and public registers.RESULTS: Participation rates were higher than 80% at examinations at age 40, 45, and 51, but decreased to 65% at age 60. At the baseline investigation at age 40, analyses indicated that participants were representative of the cohort as well as the background population. However, the mortality rate was higher among non-participants in the succeeding 20 years. Among living cohort members at the 60-year examination, non-participants had lower socioeconomic status, higher hospitalization rate, and a worse overall health profile than participants.CONCLUSIONS: The detailed data presented reinforce the contention that the health profile of non-participants is typically worse than that of participants. The results also indicate that while data from public registers give easily accessible information about non-participants, these crude proxy measures of health may not be enough to document representativeness.

KW - Adult

KW - Cohort Studies

KW - Data Collection

KW - Denmark

KW - Epidemiologic Methods

KW - Follow-Up Studies

KW - Health Surveys

KW - Humans

KW - Interviews as Topic

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Patient Participation

KW - Population Surveillance

KW - Prospective Studies

KW - Socioeconomic Factors

KW - Surveys and Questionnaires

KW - Comparative Study

KW - Journal Article

KW - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

U2 - 10.1080/14034940600607616

DO - 10.1080/14034940600607616

M3 - Journal article

VL - 34

SP - 623

EP - 631

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Public Health

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Public Health

SN - 1403-4948

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 49837927