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Remdesivir for the Treatment of Covid-19 - Final Report

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Harvard

Beigel, JH, Tomashek, KM, Dodd, LE, Mehta, AK, Zingman, BS, Kalil, AC, Hohmann, E, Chu, HY, Luetkemeyer, A, Kline, S, Lopez de Castilla, D, Finberg, RW, Dierberg, K, Tapson, V, Hsieh, L, Patterson, TF, Paredes, R, Sweeney, DA, Short, WR, Touloumi, G, Lye, DC, Ohmagari, N, Oh, M-D, Ruiz-Palacios, GM, Benfield, T, Fätkenheuer, G, Kortepeter, MG, Atmar, RL, Creech, CB, Lundgren, J, Babiker, AG, Pett, S, Neaton, JD, Burgess, TH, Bonnett, T, Green, M, Makowski, M, Osinusi, A, Nayak, S, Lane, HC, ACTT-1 Study Group Members, Lindegaard Madsen, B & Østergaard Jensen, T 2020, 'Remdesivir for the Treatment of Covid-19 - Final Report', The New England journal of medicine, bind 383, nr. 19, s. 1813-1826. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa2007764

APA

Beigel, J. H., Tomashek, K. M., Dodd, L. E., Mehta, A. K., Zingman, B. S., Kalil, A. C., Hohmann, E., Chu, H. Y., Luetkemeyer, A., Kline, S., Lopez de Castilla, D., Finberg, R. W., Dierberg, K., Tapson, V., Hsieh, L., Patterson, T. F., Paredes, R., Sweeney, D. A., Short, W. R., ... Østergaard Jensen, T. (2020). Remdesivir for the Treatment of Covid-19 - Final Report. The New England journal of medicine, 383(19), 1813-1826. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa2007764

CBE

Beigel JH, Tomashek KM, Dodd LE, Mehta AK, Zingman BS, Kalil AC, Hohmann E, Chu HY, Luetkemeyer A, Kline S, Lopez de Castilla D, Finberg RW, Dierberg K, Tapson V, Hsieh L, Patterson TF, Paredes R, Sweeney DA, Short WR, Touloumi G, Lye DC, Ohmagari N, Oh M-D, Ruiz-Palacios GM, Benfield T, Fätkenheuer G, Kortepeter MG, Atmar RL, Creech CB, Lundgren J, Babiker AG, Pett S, Neaton JD, Burgess TH, Bonnett T, Green M, Makowski M, Osinusi A, Nayak S, Lane HC, ACTT-1 Study Group Members, Lindegaard Madsen B, Østergaard Jensen T. 2020. Remdesivir for the Treatment of Covid-19 - Final Report. The New England journal of medicine. 383(19):1813-1826. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa2007764

MLA

Vancouver

Beigel JH, Tomashek KM, Dodd LE, Mehta AK, Zingman BS, Kalil AC o.a. Remdesivir for the Treatment of Covid-19 - Final Report. The New England journal of medicine. 2020 nov 5;383(19):1813-1826. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa2007764

Author

Beigel, John H ; Tomashek, Kay M ; Dodd, Lori E ; Mehta, Aneesh K ; Zingman, Barry S ; Kalil, Andre C ; Hohmann, Elizabeth ; Chu, Helen Y ; Luetkemeyer, Annie ; Kline, Susan ; Lopez de Castilla, Diego ; Finberg, Robert W ; Dierberg, Kerry ; Tapson, Victor ; Hsieh, Lanny ; Patterson, Thomas F ; Paredes, Roger ; Sweeney, Daniel A ; Short, William R ; Touloumi, Giota ; Lye, David Chien ; Ohmagari, Norio ; Oh, Myoung-Don ; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo M ; Benfield, Thomas ; Fätkenheuer, Gerd ; Kortepeter, Mark G ; Atmar, Robert L ; Creech, C Buddy ; Lundgren, Jens ; Babiker, Abdel G ; Pett, Sarah ; Neaton, James D ; Burgess, Timothy H ; Bonnett, Tyler ; Green, Michelle ; Makowski, Mat ; Osinusi, Anu ; Nayak, Seema ; Lane, H Clifford ; ACTT-1 Study Group Members ; Lindegaard Madsen, Birgitte ; Østergaard Jensen, Tomas. / Remdesivir for the Treatment of Covid-19 - Final Report. I: The New England journal of medicine. 2020 ; Bind 383, Nr. 19. s. 1813-1826.

Bibtex

@article{4daa3c2c801349a399a924f50f8282bf,
title = "Remdesivir for the Treatment of Covid-19 - Final Report",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Although several therapeutic agents have been evaluated for the treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19), no antiviral agents have yet been shown to be efficacious.METHODS: We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of intravenous remdesivir in adults who were hospitalized with Covid-19 and had evidence of lower respiratory tract infection. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either remdesivir (200 mg loading dose on day 1, followed by 100 mg daily for up to 9 additional days) or placebo for up to 10 days. The primary outcome was the time to recovery, defined by either discharge from the hospital or hospitalization for infection-control purposes only.RESULTS: A total of 1062 patients underwent randomization (with 541 assigned to remdesivir and 521 to placebo). Those who received remdesivir had a median recovery time of 10 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 9 to 11), as compared with 15 days (95% CI, 13 to 18) among those who received placebo (rate ratio for recovery, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.49; P<0.001, by a log-rank test). In an analysis that used a proportional-odds model with an eight-category ordinal scale, the patients who received remdesivir were found to be more likely than those who received placebo to have clinical improvement at day 15 (odds ratio, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2 to 1.9, after adjustment for actual disease severity). The Kaplan-Meier estimates of mortality were 6.7% with remdesivir and 11.9% with placebo by day 15 and 11.4% with remdesivir and 15.2% with placebo by day 29 (hazard ratio, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.52 to 1.03). Serious adverse events were reported in 131 of the 532 patients who received remdesivir (24.6%) and in 163 of the 516 patients who received placebo (31.6%).CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that remdesivir was superior to placebo in shortening the time to recovery in adults who were hospitalized with Covid-19 and had evidence of lower respiratory tract infection. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and others; ACTT-1 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT04280705.).",
author = "Beigel, {John H} and Tomashek, {Kay M} and Dodd, {Lori E} and Mehta, {Aneesh K} and Zingman, {Barry S} and Kalil, {Andre C} and Elizabeth Hohmann and Chu, {Helen Y} and Annie Luetkemeyer and Susan Kline and {Lopez de Castilla}, Diego and Finberg, {Robert W} and Kerry Dierberg and Victor Tapson and Lanny Hsieh and Patterson, {Thomas F} and Roger Paredes and Sweeney, {Daniel A} and Short, {William R} and Giota Touloumi and Lye, {David Chien} and Norio Ohmagari and Myoung-Don Oh and Ruiz-Palacios, {Guillermo M} and Thomas Benfield and Gerd F{\"a}tkenheuer and Kortepeter, {Mark G} and Atmar, {Robert L} and Creech, {C Buddy} and Jens Lundgren and Babiker, {Abdel G} and Sarah Pett and Neaton, {James D} and Burgess, {Timothy H} and Tyler Bonnett and Michelle Green and Mat Makowski and Anu Osinusi and Seema Nayak and Lane, {H Clifford} and {ACTT-1 Study Group Members} and {Lindegaard Madsen}, Birgitte and {{\O}stergaard Jensen}, Tomas",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2020 Massachusetts Medical Society.",
year = "2020",
month = nov,
day = "5",
doi = "10.1056/NEJMoa2007764",
language = "English",
volume = "383",
pages = "1813--1826",
journal = "New England Journal of Medicine",
issn = "0028-4793",
publisher = "Massachusetts Medical Society",
number = "19",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Remdesivir for the Treatment of Covid-19 - Final Report

AU - Beigel, John H

AU - Tomashek, Kay M

AU - Dodd, Lori E

AU - Mehta, Aneesh K

AU - Zingman, Barry S

AU - Kalil, Andre C

AU - Hohmann, Elizabeth

AU - Chu, Helen Y

AU - Luetkemeyer, Annie

AU - Kline, Susan

AU - Lopez de Castilla, Diego

AU - Finberg, Robert W

AU - Dierberg, Kerry

AU - Tapson, Victor

AU - Hsieh, Lanny

AU - Patterson, Thomas F

AU - Paredes, Roger

AU - Sweeney, Daniel A

AU - Short, William R

AU - Touloumi, Giota

AU - Lye, David Chien

AU - Ohmagari, Norio

AU - Oh, Myoung-Don

AU - Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo M

AU - Benfield, Thomas

AU - Fätkenheuer, Gerd

AU - Kortepeter, Mark G

AU - Atmar, Robert L

AU - Creech, C Buddy

AU - Lundgren, Jens

AU - Babiker, Abdel G

AU - Pett, Sarah

AU - Neaton, James D

AU - Burgess, Timothy H

AU - Bonnett, Tyler

AU - Green, Michelle

AU - Makowski, Mat

AU - Osinusi, Anu

AU - Nayak, Seema

AU - Lane, H Clifford

AU - ACTT-1 Study Group Members

A2 - Lindegaard Madsen, Birgitte

A2 - Østergaard Jensen, Tomas

N1 - Copyright © 2020 Massachusetts Medical Society.

PY - 2020/11/5

Y1 - 2020/11/5

N2 - BACKGROUND: Although several therapeutic agents have been evaluated for the treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19), no antiviral agents have yet been shown to be efficacious.METHODS: We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of intravenous remdesivir in adults who were hospitalized with Covid-19 and had evidence of lower respiratory tract infection. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either remdesivir (200 mg loading dose on day 1, followed by 100 mg daily for up to 9 additional days) or placebo for up to 10 days. The primary outcome was the time to recovery, defined by either discharge from the hospital or hospitalization for infection-control purposes only.RESULTS: A total of 1062 patients underwent randomization (with 541 assigned to remdesivir and 521 to placebo). Those who received remdesivir had a median recovery time of 10 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 9 to 11), as compared with 15 days (95% CI, 13 to 18) among those who received placebo (rate ratio for recovery, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.49; P<0.001, by a log-rank test). In an analysis that used a proportional-odds model with an eight-category ordinal scale, the patients who received remdesivir were found to be more likely than those who received placebo to have clinical improvement at day 15 (odds ratio, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2 to 1.9, after adjustment for actual disease severity). The Kaplan-Meier estimates of mortality were 6.7% with remdesivir and 11.9% with placebo by day 15 and 11.4% with remdesivir and 15.2% with placebo by day 29 (hazard ratio, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.52 to 1.03). Serious adverse events were reported in 131 of the 532 patients who received remdesivir (24.6%) and in 163 of the 516 patients who received placebo (31.6%).CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that remdesivir was superior to placebo in shortening the time to recovery in adults who were hospitalized with Covid-19 and had evidence of lower respiratory tract infection. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and others; ACTT-1 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT04280705.).

AB - BACKGROUND: Although several therapeutic agents have been evaluated for the treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19), no antiviral agents have yet been shown to be efficacious.METHODS: We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of intravenous remdesivir in adults who were hospitalized with Covid-19 and had evidence of lower respiratory tract infection. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either remdesivir (200 mg loading dose on day 1, followed by 100 mg daily for up to 9 additional days) or placebo for up to 10 days. The primary outcome was the time to recovery, defined by either discharge from the hospital or hospitalization for infection-control purposes only.RESULTS: A total of 1062 patients underwent randomization (with 541 assigned to remdesivir and 521 to placebo). Those who received remdesivir had a median recovery time of 10 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 9 to 11), as compared with 15 days (95% CI, 13 to 18) among those who received placebo (rate ratio for recovery, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.49; P<0.001, by a log-rank test). In an analysis that used a proportional-odds model with an eight-category ordinal scale, the patients who received remdesivir were found to be more likely than those who received placebo to have clinical improvement at day 15 (odds ratio, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2 to 1.9, after adjustment for actual disease severity). The Kaplan-Meier estimates of mortality were 6.7% with remdesivir and 11.9% with placebo by day 15 and 11.4% with remdesivir and 15.2% with placebo by day 29 (hazard ratio, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.52 to 1.03). Serious adverse events were reported in 131 of the 532 patients who received remdesivir (24.6%) and in 163 of the 516 patients who received placebo (31.6%).CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that remdesivir was superior to placebo in shortening the time to recovery in adults who were hospitalized with Covid-19 and had evidence of lower respiratory tract infection. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and others; ACTT-1 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT04280705.).

U2 - 10.1056/NEJMoa2007764

DO - 10.1056/NEJMoa2007764

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32445440

VL - 383

SP - 1813

EP - 1826

JO - New England Journal of Medicine

JF - New England Journal of Medicine

SN - 0028-4793

IS - 19

ER -

ID: 59909544