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(Re)framing school as a setting for promoting health and well-being: a double translation process

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@article{eefd8297bc0a4d42b788823485100d47,
title = "(Re)framing school as a setting for promoting health and well-being: a double translation process",
abstract = "The aim of this paper is to discuss the ways in which the setting approach to health promotion in schools, as part of knowledge-based international policies and guidelines, is embedded in the Danish policy landscape and enacted at the local governance level. The study draws on the sociology of translation and treats policy implementation as a non-linear process of (re)interpretation involving different actors in plural, mutually interwoven, non-hierarchical networks. Data were generated and analysed using a three-tiered process: the first tier focused on key international guidelines, the second on national policies, and the third on policies in selected municipalities. Through these tiers, we discuss actors and actor networks involved in the translation processes, their interactions and the dynamics of problematisation at the national and local levels. The results point to two different, but entangled, processes of translation. At the national level, despite resistance by a number of actors with differing priorities, the translation resulted in the integration of selected key principles of the setting approach to health promotion in the national curriculum for health education. At the municipal level, however, the principles seem to be {\textquoteleft}lost in translation{\textquoteright}, as the treatment of schools as settings for promoting health and well-being remains largely subordinate to the discourses of disease prevention and individual behaviour regulation, dominated by the agenda of actors in the health sector.",
keywords = "Setting-based health promotion, health-promoting schools, municipalities, policy, translation",
author = "{Lindegaard Nordin}, Lone and Didier Jourdan and Venka Simovska",
note = "doi: 10.1080/09581596.2018.1449944",
year = "2019",
month = may,
day = "27",
doi = "10.1080/09581596.2018.1449944",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "325--336",
journal = "Critical Public Health",
issn = "0958-1596",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - (Re)framing school as a setting for promoting health and well-being: a double translation process

AU - Lindegaard Nordin, Lone

AU - Jourdan, Didier

AU - Simovska, Venka

N1 - doi: 10.1080/09581596.2018.1449944

PY - 2019/5/27

Y1 - 2019/5/27

N2 - The aim of this paper is to discuss the ways in which the setting approach to health promotion in schools, as part of knowledge-based international policies and guidelines, is embedded in the Danish policy landscape and enacted at the local governance level. The study draws on the sociology of translation and treats policy implementation as a non-linear process of (re)interpretation involving different actors in plural, mutually interwoven, non-hierarchical networks. Data were generated and analysed using a three-tiered process: the first tier focused on key international guidelines, the second on national policies, and the third on policies in selected municipalities. Through these tiers, we discuss actors and actor networks involved in the translation processes, their interactions and the dynamics of problematisation at the national and local levels. The results point to two different, but entangled, processes of translation. At the national level, despite resistance by a number of actors with differing priorities, the translation resulted in the integration of selected key principles of the setting approach to health promotion in the national curriculum for health education. At the municipal level, however, the principles seem to be ‘lost in translation’, as the treatment of schools as settings for promoting health and well-being remains largely subordinate to the discourses of disease prevention and individual behaviour regulation, dominated by the agenda of actors in the health sector.

AB - The aim of this paper is to discuss the ways in which the setting approach to health promotion in schools, as part of knowledge-based international policies and guidelines, is embedded in the Danish policy landscape and enacted at the local governance level. The study draws on the sociology of translation and treats policy implementation as a non-linear process of (re)interpretation involving different actors in plural, mutually interwoven, non-hierarchical networks. Data were generated and analysed using a three-tiered process: the first tier focused on key international guidelines, the second on national policies, and the third on policies in selected municipalities. Through these tiers, we discuss actors and actor networks involved in the translation processes, their interactions and the dynamics of problematisation at the national and local levels. The results point to two different, but entangled, processes of translation. At the national level, despite resistance by a number of actors with differing priorities, the translation resulted in the integration of selected key principles of the setting approach to health promotion in the national curriculum for health education. At the municipal level, however, the principles seem to be ‘lost in translation’, as the treatment of schools as settings for promoting health and well-being remains largely subordinate to the discourses of disease prevention and individual behaviour regulation, dominated by the agenda of actors in the health sector.

KW - Setting-based health promotion

KW - health-promoting schools

KW - municipalities

KW - policy

KW - translation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85044065859&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/09581596.2018.1449944

DO - 10.1080/09581596.2018.1449944

M3 - Journal article

VL - 29

SP - 325

EP - 336

JO - Critical Public Health

JF - Critical Public Health

SN - 0958-1596

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 58138397