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Red blood cell sodium transport in patients with cirrhosis

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@article{4c9bd4190209453890b0050fd2f87656,
title = "Red blood cell sodium transport in patients with cirrhosis",
abstract = "Patients with advanced cirrhosis have abnormal sodium homoeostasis. The study was undertaken to quantify the sodium transport across the plasma membrane of red blood cells (RBC) in patients with cirrhosis. RBC efflux and influx of sodium were studied in vitro with tracer (22) Na(+) according to linear kinetics in 24 patients with cirrhosis and 14 healthy controls. The sodium efflux was modified by ouabain (O), furosemide (F) and a combination of O and F (O + F). RBC sodium was significantly decreased (4·6 versus control 6·3 mmol l(-1) , P<0·001) and directly related to serum sodium (r = 0·57, P<0·05). The RBC fractional sodium efflux was higher in patients with cirrhosis (+46%, P<0·01) compared to controls. Inhibition in both high (145 mmol l(-1) )- and low (120 mmol l(-1) )-sodium buffers showed that the F-insensitive sodium efflux was twice as high in cirrhosis as in controls (P = 0·03-0·007), especially the O-sensitive, F-insensitive efflux was increased (+ 225%, P = 0·01-0·006). Fractional F-sensitive transport was normal in cirrhosis. RBC sodium influx was largely normal in cirrhosis. In conclusion, RBC sodium content is reduced in patients with cirrhosis with a direct relation to serum sodium. Increased RBC sodium efflux is especially related to ouabain-sensitive, furosemide-insensitive transport and thus most likely due to upregulated activity of the sodium-potassium pump. The study gives no evidence to an altered intracellular/extracellular sodium ratio or to a reduced fractional furosemide-sensitive sodium transport in cirrhosis.",
author = "Henriksen, {Ulrik L{\"u}tken} and Marianne Kiszka-Kanowitz and Flemming Bendtsen and Henriksen, {Jens H}",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.",
year = "2016",
month = sep,
doi = "10.1111/cpf.12238",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "359--367",
journal = "Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging",
issn = "1475-0961",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Red blood cell sodium transport in patients with cirrhosis

AU - Henriksen, Ulrik Lütken

AU - Kiszka-Kanowitz, Marianne

AU - Bendtsen, Flemming

AU - Henriksen, Jens H

N1 - © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

PY - 2016/9

Y1 - 2016/9

N2 - Patients with advanced cirrhosis have abnormal sodium homoeostasis. The study was undertaken to quantify the sodium transport across the plasma membrane of red blood cells (RBC) in patients with cirrhosis. RBC efflux and influx of sodium were studied in vitro with tracer (22) Na(+) according to linear kinetics in 24 patients with cirrhosis and 14 healthy controls. The sodium efflux was modified by ouabain (O), furosemide (F) and a combination of O and F (O + F). RBC sodium was significantly decreased (4·6 versus control 6·3 mmol l(-1) , P<0·001) and directly related to serum sodium (r = 0·57, P<0·05). The RBC fractional sodium efflux was higher in patients with cirrhosis (+46%, P<0·01) compared to controls. Inhibition in both high (145 mmol l(-1) )- and low (120 mmol l(-1) )-sodium buffers showed that the F-insensitive sodium efflux was twice as high in cirrhosis as in controls (P = 0·03-0·007), especially the O-sensitive, F-insensitive efflux was increased (+ 225%, P = 0·01-0·006). Fractional F-sensitive transport was normal in cirrhosis. RBC sodium influx was largely normal in cirrhosis. In conclusion, RBC sodium content is reduced in patients with cirrhosis with a direct relation to serum sodium. Increased RBC sodium efflux is especially related to ouabain-sensitive, furosemide-insensitive transport and thus most likely due to upregulated activity of the sodium-potassium pump. The study gives no evidence to an altered intracellular/extracellular sodium ratio or to a reduced fractional furosemide-sensitive sodium transport in cirrhosis.

AB - Patients with advanced cirrhosis have abnormal sodium homoeostasis. The study was undertaken to quantify the sodium transport across the plasma membrane of red blood cells (RBC) in patients with cirrhosis. RBC efflux and influx of sodium were studied in vitro with tracer (22) Na(+) according to linear kinetics in 24 patients with cirrhosis and 14 healthy controls. The sodium efflux was modified by ouabain (O), furosemide (F) and a combination of O and F (O + F). RBC sodium was significantly decreased (4·6 versus control 6·3 mmol l(-1) , P<0·001) and directly related to serum sodium (r = 0·57, P<0·05). The RBC fractional sodium efflux was higher in patients with cirrhosis (+46%, P<0·01) compared to controls. Inhibition in both high (145 mmol l(-1) )- and low (120 mmol l(-1) )-sodium buffers showed that the F-insensitive sodium efflux was twice as high in cirrhosis as in controls (P = 0·03-0·007), especially the O-sensitive, F-insensitive efflux was increased (+ 225%, P = 0·01-0·006). Fractional F-sensitive transport was normal in cirrhosis. RBC sodium influx was largely normal in cirrhosis. In conclusion, RBC sodium content is reduced in patients with cirrhosis with a direct relation to serum sodium. Increased RBC sodium efflux is especially related to ouabain-sensitive, furosemide-insensitive transport and thus most likely due to upregulated activity of the sodium-potassium pump. The study gives no evidence to an altered intracellular/extracellular sodium ratio or to a reduced fractional furosemide-sensitive sodium transport in cirrhosis.

U2 - 10.1111/cpf.12238

DO - 10.1111/cpf.12238

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 26016736

VL - 36

SP - 359

EP - 367

JO - Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging

JF - Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging

SN - 1475-0961

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 45445578