Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Rates of re-excision and conversion to mastectomy after breast-conserving surgery with or without oncoplastic surgery: a nationwide population-based study

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{8c35ec03658d4c3db9937406cbf5c583,
title = "Rates of re-excision and conversion to mastectomy after breast-conserving surgery with or without oncoplastic surgery: a nationwide population-based study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: There is no consensus regarding the impact of oncoplastic surgery (OPS) on rates of re-excision and conversion to mastectomy following breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Here these two outcomes after BCS and OPS were compared in a nationwide population-based setting.METHODS: In Denmark, all OPS is registered and categorized into volume displacement, volume reduction or volume replacement. Patients who underwent BCS or OPS between 2012 and 2018 were selected from the Danish Breast Cancer Group database. Multivariable analyses were performed to adjust for confounders, and propensity score matching to limit potential confounding by indication bias.RESULTS: A total of 13 185 patients (72·5 per cent) underwent BCS and 5003 (27·5 per cent) OPS. Volume displacement was used in 4171 patients (83·4 per cent), volume reduction in 679 (13·6 per cent) and volume replacement in 153 (3·1 per cent). Re-excision rates were 15·6 and 14·1 per cent after BCS and OPS respectively. After adjusting for confounders, patients were less likely to have a re-excision following OPS than BCS (odds ratio (OR) 0·80, 95 per cent c.i. 0·72 to 0·88), specifically after volume displacement and reduction. The rate of conversion to mastectomy was similar after OPS and BCS (3·2 versus 3·7 per cent; P = 0·105), but with a lower risk in adjusted analysis (OR 0·69, 0·58 to 0·84), specifically after volume displacement and reduction procedures. Findings were similar after propensity score matching.CONCLUSION: A modest decrease in re-excision rate and less frequent conversion to mastectomy were observed after OPS compared with BCS.",
keywords = "Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Breast Neoplasms/surgery, Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/surgery, Carcinoma, Lobular/surgery, Databases, Factual, Denmark, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Logistic Models, Mastectomy, Segmental, Mastectomy/statistics & numerical data, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Propensity Score, Reoperation/statistics & numerical data, Treatment Outcome",
author = "E Heeg and Jensen, {M B} and H{\"o}lmich, {L R} and A Bodilsen and Tollenaar, {R A E M} and Laenkholm, {A V} and Offersen, {B V} and B Ejlertsen and Mureau, {M A M} and Christiansen, {P M}",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2020 The Authors. British Journal of Surgery published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of BJS Society Ltd.",
year = "2020",
month = dec,
doi = "10.1002/bjs.11838",
language = "English",
volume = "107",
pages = "1762--1772",
journal = "Archivum Chirurgicum Neerlandicum",
issn = "0007-1323",
publisher = "John/Wiley & Sons Ltd",
number = "13",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Rates of re-excision and conversion to mastectomy after breast-conserving surgery with or without oncoplastic surgery

T2 - a nationwide population-based study

AU - Heeg, E

AU - Jensen, M B

AU - Hölmich, L R

AU - Bodilsen, A

AU - Tollenaar, R A E M

AU - Laenkholm, A V

AU - Offersen, B V

AU - Ejlertsen, B

AU - Mureau, M A M

AU - Christiansen, P M

N1 - © 2020 The Authors. British Journal of Surgery published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of BJS Society Ltd.

PY - 2020/12

Y1 - 2020/12

N2 - BACKGROUND: There is no consensus regarding the impact of oncoplastic surgery (OPS) on rates of re-excision and conversion to mastectomy following breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Here these two outcomes after BCS and OPS were compared in a nationwide population-based setting.METHODS: In Denmark, all OPS is registered and categorized into volume displacement, volume reduction or volume replacement. Patients who underwent BCS or OPS between 2012 and 2018 were selected from the Danish Breast Cancer Group database. Multivariable analyses were performed to adjust for confounders, and propensity score matching to limit potential confounding by indication bias.RESULTS: A total of 13 185 patients (72·5 per cent) underwent BCS and 5003 (27·5 per cent) OPS. Volume displacement was used in 4171 patients (83·4 per cent), volume reduction in 679 (13·6 per cent) and volume replacement in 153 (3·1 per cent). Re-excision rates were 15·6 and 14·1 per cent after BCS and OPS respectively. After adjusting for confounders, patients were less likely to have a re-excision following OPS than BCS (odds ratio (OR) 0·80, 95 per cent c.i. 0·72 to 0·88), specifically after volume displacement and reduction. The rate of conversion to mastectomy was similar after OPS and BCS (3·2 versus 3·7 per cent; P = 0·105), but with a lower risk in adjusted analysis (OR 0·69, 0·58 to 0·84), specifically after volume displacement and reduction procedures. Findings were similar after propensity score matching.CONCLUSION: A modest decrease in re-excision rate and less frequent conversion to mastectomy were observed after OPS compared with BCS.

AB - BACKGROUND: There is no consensus regarding the impact of oncoplastic surgery (OPS) on rates of re-excision and conversion to mastectomy following breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Here these two outcomes after BCS and OPS were compared in a nationwide population-based setting.METHODS: In Denmark, all OPS is registered and categorized into volume displacement, volume reduction or volume replacement. Patients who underwent BCS or OPS between 2012 and 2018 were selected from the Danish Breast Cancer Group database. Multivariable analyses were performed to adjust for confounders, and propensity score matching to limit potential confounding by indication bias.RESULTS: A total of 13 185 patients (72·5 per cent) underwent BCS and 5003 (27·5 per cent) OPS. Volume displacement was used in 4171 patients (83·4 per cent), volume reduction in 679 (13·6 per cent) and volume replacement in 153 (3·1 per cent). Re-excision rates were 15·6 and 14·1 per cent after BCS and OPS respectively. After adjusting for confounders, patients were less likely to have a re-excision following OPS than BCS (odds ratio (OR) 0·80, 95 per cent c.i. 0·72 to 0·88), specifically after volume displacement and reduction. The rate of conversion to mastectomy was similar after OPS and BCS (3·2 versus 3·7 per cent; P = 0·105), but with a lower risk in adjusted analysis (OR 0·69, 0·58 to 0·84), specifically after volume displacement and reduction procedures. Findings were similar after propensity score matching.CONCLUSION: A modest decrease in re-excision rate and less frequent conversion to mastectomy were observed after OPS compared with BCS.

KW - Adult

KW - Aged

KW - Aged, 80 and over

KW - Breast Neoplasms/surgery

KW - Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/surgery

KW - Carcinoma, Lobular/surgery

KW - Databases, Factual

KW - Denmark

KW - Female

KW - Follow-Up Studies

KW - Humans

KW - Logistic Models

KW - Mastectomy, Segmental

KW - Mastectomy/statistics & numerical data

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Multivariate Analysis

KW - Propensity Score

KW - Reoperation/statistics & numerical data

KW - Treatment Outcome

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85089021395&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/bjs.11838

DO - 10.1002/bjs.11838

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32761931

VL - 107

SP - 1762

EP - 1772

JO - Archivum Chirurgicum Neerlandicum

JF - Archivum Chirurgicum Neerlandicum

SN - 0007-1323

IS - 13

ER -

ID: 61368991