Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and rapid eye movement sleep without atonia in narcolepsy

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Long-term health and socioeconomic consequences of childhood and adolescent-onset of narcolepsy

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Long-term health and socioeconomic outcome of obstructive sleep apnea in children and adolescents

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Assessment of diurnal melatonin, cortisol, activity, and sleep-wake cycle in patients with and without diabetic retinopathy

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Mandibular advancement device therapy for obstructive sleep apnea: a prospective study on predictors of treatment success

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Pupillary light responses in type 1 and type 2 diabetics with and without retinopathy

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Robust, ECG-based detection of Sleep-disordered breathing in large population-based cohorts

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Long-term health and socioeconomic consequences of childhood and adolescent-onset of narcolepsy

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Long-term health and socioeconomic outcome of obstructive sleep apnea in children and adolescents

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer
Narcolepsy is a rare disabling hypersomnia disorder that may include cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) periods, but also disrupted nighttime sleep by nocturnal awakenings, and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). RBD is characterized by dream-enacting behavior and impaired motor inhibition during REM sleep (REM sleep without atonia, RSWA). RBD is commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinsonisms, but is also reported in narcolepsy in up to 60% of patients. RBD in patients with narcolepsy is, however, a distinct phenotype with respect to other RBD patients and characterized also by absence of gender predominance, elementary rather than complex movements, less violent behavior and earlier age at onset of motor events, and strong association to narcolepsy with cataplexy/hypocretin deficiency. Patients with narcolepsy often present dissociated sleep features including RSWA, increased density of phasic chin EMG and frequent shift from REM to NREM sleep, with or without associated clinical RBD. Most patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy lack the hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. Tonic and phasic motor activities in REM sleep and dream-enacting behavior are mostly reported in presence of cataplexy. Narcolepsy without cataplexy is a condition rarely associated with hypocretin deficiency. We proposed that hypocretin neurons are centrally involved in motor control during wakefulness and sleep in humans, and that hypocretin deficiency causes a functional defect in the motor control involved in the development of cataplexy during wakefulness and RBD/RSWA/phasic motor activity during REM sleep.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftSleep Medicine
Vol/bind14
Udgave nummer8
Sider (fra-til)775-81
Antal sider7
ISSN1389-9457
DOI
StatusUdgivet - aug. 2013

ID: 42958555