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Prenatal Triclosan Exposure and Anthropometric Measures including Anogenital Distance in Danish Infants

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BACKGROUND: Triclosan (TCS) is widely used as an antibacterial agent in consumer products such as hand soap and toothpaste and human exposure is widespread. TCS is suspected of having endocrine disrupting properties, but few human studies have examined the developmental effects of prenatal TCS exposure.

OBJECTIVES: To prospectively examine associations between prenatal TCS exposure and anthropometric measures at birth and anogenital distance (AGD) at three months of age.

METHODS: Pregnant women from the Odense Child Cohort (n=514) provided urine samples around gestational week 28 (median 28.7 weeks, range 26.4 - 34.0) and urinary TCS concentration was measured by LC-MS/MS. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to examine associations between prenatal TCS exposure and measures of size at birth (birth weight, length, head and abdominal circumference) and AGD at three months of age (median 3.3 months, range 2.3 to 6.7 months) controlling for potential confounders.

RESULTS: Newborn boys in the highest quartile of prenatal TCS exposure had a 0.7 cm (95% CI: -1.2, -0.1, p=0.01) smaller head circumference compared with boys in the lowest quartile. Additionally in boys, inverse associations of borderline statistical significance between prenatal TCS exposure and abdominal circumference at birth and AGD at three months were observed (p-values <0.10). Prenatal TCS exposure was not significantly associated with any of the outcomes in girls. However, fewer girls had AGD measured and we observed no significant interactions between child sex and prenatal TCS-exposure in anthropometric measures at birth.

CONCLUSION: Prenatal TCS-exposure was associated with reduced head and abdominal circumference at birth and reduced AGD at three months of age in boys, although the two latter findings were statistically non-significant. These findings require replication, but are compatible with an anti-androgenic effect of prenatal TCS exposure on fetal growth in boys.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEnvironmental Health Perspectives
Vol/bind124
Udgave nummer8
Sider (fra-til)1261-8
ISSN0091-6765
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 23 feb. 2016

ID: 46427347