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Predictors of the discrepancy between objective and subjective cognition in bipolar disorder: a novel methodology

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@article{5c8c8ffec37c47aea2904e9a6fbd2b5d,
title = "Predictors of the discrepancy between objective and subjective cognition in bipolar disorder: a novel methodology",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: The poor relationship between subjective and objective cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder (BD) is well-established. However, beyond simple correlation, this has not been explored further using a methodology that quantifies the degree and direction of the discrepancy. This study aimed to develop such a methodology to explore clinical characteristics predictive of subjective-objective discrepancy in a large BD patient cohort.METHODS: Data from 109 remitted BD patients and 110 healthy controls were pooled from previous studies, including neuropsychological test scores, self-reported cognitive difficulties, and ratings of mood, stress, socio-occupational capacity, and quality of life. Cognitive symptom 'sensitivity' scores were calculated using a novel methodology, with positive scores reflecting disproportionately more subjective complaints than objective impairment and negative values reflecting disproportionately more objective than subjective impairment ('stoicism').RESULTS: More subsyndromal depressive and manic symptoms, hospitalizations, BD type II, and being male positively predicted 'sensitivity', while higher verbal IQ predicted more 'stoicism'. 'Sensitive' patients were characterized by greater socio-occupational difficulties, more perceived stress, and lower quality of life.CONCLUSION: Objective neuropsychological assessment seems especially warranted in patients with (residual) mood symptoms, BD type II, chronic illness, and/or high IQ for correct identification of cognitive deficits before commencement of treatments targeting cognition.",
author = "Miskowiak, {K W} and Petersen, {J Z} and Ott, {C V} and U Knorr and Kessing, {L V} and P Gallagher and L Robinson",
note = "{\circledC} 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1111/acps.12649",
language = "English",
volume = "134",
pages = "511--521",
journal = "Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica",
issn = "0001-690X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predictors of the discrepancy between objective and subjective cognition in bipolar disorder

T2 - a novel methodology

AU - Miskowiak, K W

AU - Petersen, J Z

AU - Ott, C V

AU - Knorr, U

AU - Kessing, L V

AU - Gallagher, P

AU - Robinson, L

N1 - © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

PY - 2016/12

Y1 - 2016/12

N2 - OBJECTIVE: The poor relationship between subjective and objective cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder (BD) is well-established. However, beyond simple correlation, this has not been explored further using a methodology that quantifies the degree and direction of the discrepancy. This study aimed to develop such a methodology to explore clinical characteristics predictive of subjective-objective discrepancy in a large BD patient cohort.METHODS: Data from 109 remitted BD patients and 110 healthy controls were pooled from previous studies, including neuropsychological test scores, self-reported cognitive difficulties, and ratings of mood, stress, socio-occupational capacity, and quality of life. Cognitive symptom 'sensitivity' scores were calculated using a novel methodology, with positive scores reflecting disproportionately more subjective complaints than objective impairment and negative values reflecting disproportionately more objective than subjective impairment ('stoicism').RESULTS: More subsyndromal depressive and manic symptoms, hospitalizations, BD type II, and being male positively predicted 'sensitivity', while higher verbal IQ predicted more 'stoicism'. 'Sensitive' patients were characterized by greater socio-occupational difficulties, more perceived stress, and lower quality of life.CONCLUSION: Objective neuropsychological assessment seems especially warranted in patients with (residual) mood symptoms, BD type II, chronic illness, and/or high IQ for correct identification of cognitive deficits before commencement of treatments targeting cognition.

AB - OBJECTIVE: The poor relationship between subjective and objective cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder (BD) is well-established. However, beyond simple correlation, this has not been explored further using a methodology that quantifies the degree and direction of the discrepancy. This study aimed to develop such a methodology to explore clinical characteristics predictive of subjective-objective discrepancy in a large BD patient cohort.METHODS: Data from 109 remitted BD patients and 110 healthy controls were pooled from previous studies, including neuropsychological test scores, self-reported cognitive difficulties, and ratings of mood, stress, socio-occupational capacity, and quality of life. Cognitive symptom 'sensitivity' scores were calculated using a novel methodology, with positive scores reflecting disproportionately more subjective complaints than objective impairment and negative values reflecting disproportionately more objective than subjective impairment ('stoicism').RESULTS: More subsyndromal depressive and manic symptoms, hospitalizations, BD type II, and being male positively predicted 'sensitivity', while higher verbal IQ predicted more 'stoicism'. 'Sensitive' patients were characterized by greater socio-occupational difficulties, more perceived stress, and lower quality of life.CONCLUSION: Objective neuropsychological assessment seems especially warranted in patients with (residual) mood symptoms, BD type II, chronic illness, and/or high IQ for correct identification of cognitive deficits before commencement of treatments targeting cognition.

U2 - 10.1111/acps.12649

DO - 10.1111/acps.12649

M3 - Journal article

VL - 134

SP - 511

EP - 521

JO - Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica

JF - Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica

SN - 0001-690X

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 49576535