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Predicting the Functional Roles of Knee Joint Muscles from Internal Joint Moments

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@article{b5ce26fcbc6a45469d7e0b9ce348bc08,
title = "Predicting the Functional Roles of Knee Joint Muscles from Internal Joint Moments",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: Knee muscles are commonly labeled as flexors or extensors and aptly stabilize the knee against sagittal plane loads. However, how these muscles stabilize the knee against adduction-abduction and rotational loads remains unclear. Our study sought 1) to classify muscle roles as they relate to joint stability by quantifying the relationship between individual muscle activation patterns and internal net joint moments in all three loading planes and 2) to determine whether these roles change with increasing force levels.METHODS: A standing isometric force matching protocol required subjects to modulate ground reaction forces to elicit various combinations and magnitudes of sagittal, frontal, and transverse internal joint moments. Surface EMG measured activities of 10 lower limb muscles. Partial least squares regressions determined which internal moment(s) were significantly related to the activation of individual muscles.RESULTS: Rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae were classified as moment actuators for knee extension and hip flexion. Hamstrings were classified as moment actuators for hip extension and knee flexion. Gastrocnemius and hamstring muscles were classified as specific joint stabilizers for knee rotation. Vastii were classified as general joint stabilizers because activation was independent of moment generation. Muscle roles did not change with increasing effort levels.CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate muscle activation is not dependent on anatomical orientation but perhaps on its role in maintaining knee joint stability in the frontal and transverse loading planes. This is useful for delineating the roles of biarticular knee joint muscles and could have implications in robotics, musculoskeletal modeling, sports sciences, and rehabilitation.",
keywords = "Adult, Electromyography, Female, Hamstring Muscles, Hip Joint, Humans, Isometric Contraction, Knee Joint, Lower Extremity, Male, Muscle Contraction, Muscle, Skeletal, Quadriceps Muscle, Regression Analysis, Journal Article",
author = "Flaxman, {Teresa E} and Tine Alkj{\ae}r and Simonsen, {Erik B} and Krogsgaard, {Michael R} and Benoit, {Daniel L}",
year = "2017",
month = mar,
doi = "10.1249/MSS.0000000000001125",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "527--537",
journal = "Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise",
issn = "0195-9131",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predicting the Functional Roles of Knee Joint Muscles from Internal Joint Moments

AU - Flaxman, Teresa E

AU - Alkjær, Tine

AU - Simonsen, Erik B

AU - Krogsgaard, Michael R

AU - Benoit, Daniel L

PY - 2017/3

Y1 - 2017/3

N2 - INTRODUCTION: Knee muscles are commonly labeled as flexors or extensors and aptly stabilize the knee against sagittal plane loads. However, how these muscles stabilize the knee against adduction-abduction and rotational loads remains unclear. Our study sought 1) to classify muscle roles as they relate to joint stability by quantifying the relationship between individual muscle activation patterns and internal net joint moments in all three loading planes and 2) to determine whether these roles change with increasing force levels.METHODS: A standing isometric force matching protocol required subjects to modulate ground reaction forces to elicit various combinations and magnitudes of sagittal, frontal, and transverse internal joint moments. Surface EMG measured activities of 10 lower limb muscles. Partial least squares regressions determined which internal moment(s) were significantly related to the activation of individual muscles.RESULTS: Rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae were classified as moment actuators for knee extension and hip flexion. Hamstrings were classified as moment actuators for hip extension and knee flexion. Gastrocnemius and hamstring muscles were classified as specific joint stabilizers for knee rotation. Vastii were classified as general joint stabilizers because activation was independent of moment generation. Muscle roles did not change with increasing effort levels.CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate muscle activation is not dependent on anatomical orientation but perhaps on its role in maintaining knee joint stability in the frontal and transverse loading planes. This is useful for delineating the roles of biarticular knee joint muscles and could have implications in robotics, musculoskeletal modeling, sports sciences, and rehabilitation.

AB - INTRODUCTION: Knee muscles are commonly labeled as flexors or extensors and aptly stabilize the knee against sagittal plane loads. However, how these muscles stabilize the knee against adduction-abduction and rotational loads remains unclear. Our study sought 1) to classify muscle roles as they relate to joint stability by quantifying the relationship between individual muscle activation patterns and internal net joint moments in all three loading planes and 2) to determine whether these roles change with increasing force levels.METHODS: A standing isometric force matching protocol required subjects to modulate ground reaction forces to elicit various combinations and magnitudes of sagittal, frontal, and transverse internal joint moments. Surface EMG measured activities of 10 lower limb muscles. Partial least squares regressions determined which internal moment(s) were significantly related to the activation of individual muscles.RESULTS: Rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae were classified as moment actuators for knee extension and hip flexion. Hamstrings were classified as moment actuators for hip extension and knee flexion. Gastrocnemius and hamstring muscles were classified as specific joint stabilizers for knee rotation. Vastii were classified as general joint stabilizers because activation was independent of moment generation. Muscle roles did not change with increasing effort levels.CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate muscle activation is not dependent on anatomical orientation but perhaps on its role in maintaining knee joint stability in the frontal and transverse loading planes. This is useful for delineating the roles of biarticular knee joint muscles and could have implications in robotics, musculoskeletal modeling, sports sciences, and rehabilitation.

KW - Adult

KW - Electromyography

KW - Female

KW - Hamstring Muscles

KW - Hip Joint

KW - Humans

KW - Isometric Contraction

KW - Knee Joint

KW - Lower Extremity

KW - Male

KW - Muscle Contraction

KW - Muscle, Skeletal

KW - Quadriceps Muscle

KW - Regression Analysis

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001125

DO - 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001125

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27755353

VL - 49

SP - 527

EP - 537

JO - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

JF - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

SN - 0195-9131

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 53437817