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Post-systolic shortening: normal values and association with validated echocardiographic and invasive measures of cardiac function

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@article{b4ff443bd68a4a9799d936127fafdc00,
title = "Post-systolic shortening: normal values and association with validated echocardiographic and invasive measures of cardiac function",
abstract = "Post-systolic shortening (PSS) does not contribute to the ejection of blood and may inhibit diastolic filling. We determined normal values of PSS in healthy subjects and investigated associations with echocardiographic and invasive measures of systolic and diastolic function. We prospectively analyzed participants from the general population (n = 620, mean age 47 ± 14 years) with no cardiovascular disease. Participants underwent echocardiography, including speckle tracking assessment of the post-systolic index (PSI), strain and time. We defined the PSI as: 100 × [(peak global longitudinal strain - peak systolic longitudinal strain)/(peak global longitudinal strain)]. We also included stable patients (n = 44) referred for left ventricle (LV) catheterization and echocardiography. Normal values: median PSI 2.0{\%} (IQR 0.7, 4.8), post-systolic strain 0.4{\%} (IQR 0.2, 0.8) and post-systolic time 22.6 ms (IQR 10.7, 40.8). Sex modified the relationship between PSI and age (P interaction = 0.037), such that PSI increased with age in women but not in men. PSI was associated with diastolic function (e', E/e' and E/A) (P < 0.05 for all), but not with LV ejection fraction (P = 0.08). PSI was associated with invasively measured LV pressure decline in early diastole, dP/dt min ([Formula: see text] = 0.12, P = 0.010), but not with LV pressure rise in early systole, dP/dt max ([Formula: see text]= - 0.05, P = 0.30). A PSI > 5{\%} had 82{\%} specificity and 99{\%} sensitivity for identifying impaired LV systolic and/or diastolic function. Normal values of PSS are modified by sex. The PSI is associated with most validated echocardiographic and invasive measures of cardiac systolic and diastolic function.",
keywords = "Deformation, Delayed, Echocardiography, Hibernation, Shortening",
author = "Philip Brainin and Biering-S{\o}rensen, {Sofie Reumert} and Rasmus M{\o}gelvang and {de Knegt}, {Martina Chantal} and Olsen, {Flemming Javier} and S{\o}ren Galatius and Gislason, {Gunnar Hilmar} and Jensen, {Jan Skov} and Tor Biering-S{\o}rensen",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1007/s10554-018-1474-2",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "327--337",
journal = "International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging",
issn = "1569-5794",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Post-systolic shortening

T2 - normal values and association with validated echocardiographic and invasive measures of cardiac function

AU - Brainin, Philip

AU - Biering-Sørensen, Sofie Reumert

AU - Møgelvang, Rasmus

AU - de Knegt, Martina Chantal

AU - Olsen, Flemming Javier

AU - Galatius, Søren

AU - Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

AU - Jensen, Jan Skov

AU - Biering-Sørensen, Tor

PY - 2019/2

Y1 - 2019/2

N2 - Post-systolic shortening (PSS) does not contribute to the ejection of blood and may inhibit diastolic filling. We determined normal values of PSS in healthy subjects and investigated associations with echocardiographic and invasive measures of systolic and diastolic function. We prospectively analyzed participants from the general population (n = 620, mean age 47 ± 14 years) with no cardiovascular disease. Participants underwent echocardiography, including speckle tracking assessment of the post-systolic index (PSI), strain and time. We defined the PSI as: 100 × [(peak global longitudinal strain - peak systolic longitudinal strain)/(peak global longitudinal strain)]. We also included stable patients (n = 44) referred for left ventricle (LV) catheterization and echocardiography. Normal values: median PSI 2.0% (IQR 0.7, 4.8), post-systolic strain 0.4% (IQR 0.2, 0.8) and post-systolic time 22.6 ms (IQR 10.7, 40.8). Sex modified the relationship between PSI and age (P interaction = 0.037), such that PSI increased with age in women but not in men. PSI was associated with diastolic function (e', E/e' and E/A) (P < 0.05 for all), but not with LV ejection fraction (P = 0.08). PSI was associated with invasively measured LV pressure decline in early diastole, dP/dt min ([Formula: see text] = 0.12, P = 0.010), but not with LV pressure rise in early systole, dP/dt max ([Formula: see text]= - 0.05, P = 0.30). A PSI > 5% had 82% specificity and 99% sensitivity for identifying impaired LV systolic and/or diastolic function. Normal values of PSS are modified by sex. The PSI is associated with most validated echocardiographic and invasive measures of cardiac systolic and diastolic function.

AB - Post-systolic shortening (PSS) does not contribute to the ejection of blood and may inhibit diastolic filling. We determined normal values of PSS in healthy subjects and investigated associations with echocardiographic and invasive measures of systolic and diastolic function. We prospectively analyzed participants from the general population (n = 620, mean age 47 ± 14 years) with no cardiovascular disease. Participants underwent echocardiography, including speckle tracking assessment of the post-systolic index (PSI), strain and time. We defined the PSI as: 100 × [(peak global longitudinal strain - peak systolic longitudinal strain)/(peak global longitudinal strain)]. We also included stable patients (n = 44) referred for left ventricle (LV) catheterization and echocardiography. Normal values: median PSI 2.0% (IQR 0.7, 4.8), post-systolic strain 0.4% (IQR 0.2, 0.8) and post-systolic time 22.6 ms (IQR 10.7, 40.8). Sex modified the relationship between PSI and age (P interaction = 0.037), such that PSI increased with age in women but not in men. PSI was associated with diastolic function (e', E/e' and E/A) (P < 0.05 for all), but not with LV ejection fraction (P = 0.08). PSI was associated with invasively measured LV pressure decline in early diastole, dP/dt min ([Formula: see text] = 0.12, P = 0.010), but not with LV pressure rise in early systole, dP/dt max ([Formula: see text]= - 0.05, P = 0.30). A PSI > 5% had 82% specificity and 99% sensitivity for identifying impaired LV systolic and/or diastolic function. Normal values of PSS are modified by sex. The PSI is associated with most validated echocardiographic and invasive measures of cardiac systolic and diastolic function.

KW - Deformation

KW - Delayed

KW - Echocardiography

KW - Hibernation

KW - Shortening

U2 - 10.1007/s10554-018-1474-2

DO - 10.1007/s10554-018-1474-2

M3 - Journal article

VL - 35

SP - 327

EP - 337

JO - International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging

JF - International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging

SN - 1569-5794

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 55740204