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Possible Prevention of Diabetes with a Gluten-Free Diet

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@article{f863e91687d849f8a5a637d7de57cb1e,
title = "Possible Prevention of Diabetes with a Gluten-Free Diet",
abstract = "Gluten seems a potentially important determinant in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Intake of gluten, a major component of wheat, rye, and barley, affects the microbiota and increases the intestinal permeability. Moreover, studies have demonstrated that gluten peptides, after crossing the intestinal barrier, lead to a more inflammatory milieu. Gluten peptides enter the pancreas where they affect the morphology and might induce beta-cell stress by enhancing glucose- and palmitate-stimulated insulin secretion. Interestingly, animal studies and a human study have demonstrated that a gluten-free (GF) diet during pregnancy reduces the risk of T1D. Evidence regarding the role of a GF diet in T2D is less clear. Some studies have linked intake of a GF diet to reduced obesity and T2D and suggested a role in reducing leptin- and insulin-resistance and increasing beta-cell volume. The current knowledge indicates that gluten, among many environmental factors, may be an aetiopathogenic factors for development of T1D and T2D. However, human intervention trials are needed to confirm this and the proposed mechanisms.",
keywords = "Animals, Diabetes Mellitus/prevention & control, Diet, Gluten-Free, Female, Humans, Pregnancy, Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena",
author = "Martin Haupt-Jorgensen and Holm, {Laurits J} and Knud Josefsen and Karsten Buschard",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "13",
doi = "10.3390/nu10111746",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "1746",
journal = "Nutrients",
issn = "2072-6643",
publisher = "M D P I AG",
number = "11",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Possible Prevention of Diabetes with a Gluten-Free Diet

AU - Haupt-Jorgensen, Martin

AU - Holm, Laurits J

AU - Josefsen, Knud

AU - Buschard, Karsten

PY - 2018/11/13

Y1 - 2018/11/13

N2 - Gluten seems a potentially important determinant in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Intake of gluten, a major component of wheat, rye, and barley, affects the microbiota and increases the intestinal permeability. Moreover, studies have demonstrated that gluten peptides, after crossing the intestinal barrier, lead to a more inflammatory milieu. Gluten peptides enter the pancreas where they affect the morphology and might induce beta-cell stress by enhancing glucose- and palmitate-stimulated insulin secretion. Interestingly, animal studies and a human study have demonstrated that a gluten-free (GF) diet during pregnancy reduces the risk of T1D. Evidence regarding the role of a GF diet in T2D is less clear. Some studies have linked intake of a GF diet to reduced obesity and T2D and suggested a role in reducing leptin- and insulin-resistance and increasing beta-cell volume. The current knowledge indicates that gluten, among many environmental factors, may be an aetiopathogenic factors for development of T1D and T2D. However, human intervention trials are needed to confirm this and the proposed mechanisms.

AB - Gluten seems a potentially important determinant in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Intake of gluten, a major component of wheat, rye, and barley, affects the microbiota and increases the intestinal permeability. Moreover, studies have demonstrated that gluten peptides, after crossing the intestinal barrier, lead to a more inflammatory milieu. Gluten peptides enter the pancreas where they affect the morphology and might induce beta-cell stress by enhancing glucose- and palmitate-stimulated insulin secretion. Interestingly, animal studies and a human study have demonstrated that a gluten-free (GF) diet during pregnancy reduces the risk of T1D. Evidence regarding the role of a GF diet in T2D is less clear. Some studies have linked intake of a GF diet to reduced obesity and T2D and suggested a role in reducing leptin- and insulin-resistance and increasing beta-cell volume. The current knowledge indicates that gluten, among many environmental factors, may be an aetiopathogenic factors for development of T1D and T2D. However, human intervention trials are needed to confirm this and the proposed mechanisms.

KW - Animals

KW - Diabetes Mellitus/prevention & control

KW - Diet, Gluten-Free

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Pregnancy

KW - Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena

U2 - 10.3390/nu10111746

DO - 10.3390/nu10111746

M3 - Review

VL - 10

SP - 1746

JO - Nutrients

JF - Nutrients

SN - 2072-6643

IS - 11

ER -

ID: 56440800