Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Region Hovedstaden - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Plasma osmolality and oxygen consumption of perch Perca fluviatilis in response to different salinities and temperatures

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Design and setup of intermittent-flow respirometry system for aquatic organisms

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Effect of closed v. intermittent-flow respirometry on hypoxia tolerance in the shiner perch Cymatogaster aggregata

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Quantitative fluorescence angiography detects dynamic changes in gastric perfusion

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Reliable and valid assessment of procedural skills in resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA)

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Validation of an assessment tool for estimation of abdominal aortic aneurysm compression in diagnostic ultrasound

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Assessment of competence in local anaesthetic thoracoscopy: development and validity investigation of a new assessment tool

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  5. Automatic and Objective Assessment of Motor Skills Performance in Flexible Bronchoscopy

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer

The present study determined the blood plasma osmolality and oxygen consumption of the perch Perca fluviatilis at different salinities (0, 10 and 15) and temperatures (5, 10 and 20° C). Blood plasma osmolality increased with salinity at all temperatures. Standard metabolic rate (SMR) increased with salinity at 10 and 20° C. Maximum metabolic rate (MMR) and aerobic scope was lowest at salinity of 15 at 5° C, yet at 20° C, they were lowest at a salinity of 0. A cost of osmoregulation (SMR at a salinity of 0 and 15 compared with SMR at a salinity of 10) could only be detected at a salinity of 15 at 20° C, where it was 28%. The results show that P. fluviatilis have capacity to osmoregulate in hyper-osmotic environments. This contradicts previous studies and indicates intraspecific variability in osmoregulatory capabilities among P. fluviatilis populations or habitat origins. An apparent cost of osmoregulation (28%) at a salinity of 15 at 20° C indicates that the cost of osmoregulation in P. fluviatilis increases with temperature under hyperosmotic conditions and a power analysis showed that the cost of osmoregulation could be lower than 12·5% under other environmental conditions. The effect of salinity on MMR is possibly due to a reduction in gill permeability, initiated to reduce osmotic stress. An interaction between salinity and temperature on aerobic scope shows that high salinity habitats are energetically beneficial during warm periods (summer), whereas low salinity habitats are energetically beneficial during cold periods (winter). It is suggested, therefore, that the seasonal migrations of P. fluviatilis between brackish and fresh water is to select an environment that is optimal for metabolism and aerobic scope.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Fish Biology
Vol/bind90
Udgave nummer3
Sider (fra-til)819-833
Antal sider15
ISSN0022-1112
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1 mar. 2017

ID: 51564016