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Physical demand at work and sick leave due to low back pain: a cross-sectional study

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@article{85ced43c9cb3496093a08ad5cecd8c17,
title = "Physical demand at work and sick leave due to low back pain: a cross-sectional study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To investigate if self-reported high physical demand at work, objective physical workload using a job exposure matrix (JEM) and fear-avoidance beliefs are associated with reported sick leave in the previous year in persons with low back pain (LBP). Second, to investigate if the effects of fear-avoidance and self-reported high physical demand at work on sick leave are modified by the objective physical workloads.SETTINGS: Participants were recruited from general practice and by advertisement in a local newspaper.PARTICIPANTS: 305participants with a current period of 2-4 weeks LBP and self-reported difficulty in maintaining physically demanding jobs due to LBP were interviewed, clinically examined and had an MRI at baseline.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Independent variables were high fear-avoidance, self-reported high physical demand at work and objective measures of physical workloads (JEM). Outcome was self-reported sick leave due to LBP in the previous year. Logistic regression and tests for interaction were used to identify risk factors and modifiers for the association with self-reported sick leave.RESULTS: Self-reported physically demanding work and high fear-avoidance were significantly associated with prior sick leave due to LBP in the previous year with OR 1.75 95{\%} CI (1.10 to 2.75) and 2.75 95{\%} CI (1.61to 4.84), respectively. No objective physical workloads had significant associations. There was no modifying effect of objective physical workloads on the association between self-reported physical demand at work/high fear-avoidance and sick leave.CONCLUSIONS: Occupational interventions to reduce sick leave due to LBP may have to focus more on those with high self-reported physical demands and high fear-avoidance, and less on individuals with the objectively highest physical workload.TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02015572; Post-results.",
author = "Jonathan Petersen and Lilli Kirkeskov and Hansen, {Bjarke Brandt} and Begtrup, {Luise Moelenberg} and Flachs, {Esben Meulengracht} and Mikael Boesen and Philip Hansen and Henning Bliddal and Kryger, {Ann Isabel}",
note = "{\circledC} Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "22",
doi = "10.1136/bmjopen-2018-026917",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "e026917",
journal = "BMJ Paediatrics Open",
issn = "2044-6055",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Physical demand at work and sick leave due to low back pain

T2 - a cross-sectional study

AU - Petersen, Jonathan

AU - Kirkeskov, Lilli

AU - Hansen, Bjarke Brandt

AU - Begtrup, Luise Moelenberg

AU - Flachs, Esben Meulengracht

AU - Boesen, Mikael

AU - Hansen, Philip

AU - Bliddal, Henning

AU - Kryger, Ann Isabel

N1 - © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

PY - 2019/5/22

Y1 - 2019/5/22

N2 - OBJECTIVES: To investigate if self-reported high physical demand at work, objective physical workload using a job exposure matrix (JEM) and fear-avoidance beliefs are associated with reported sick leave in the previous year in persons with low back pain (LBP). Second, to investigate if the effects of fear-avoidance and self-reported high physical demand at work on sick leave are modified by the objective physical workloads.SETTINGS: Participants were recruited from general practice and by advertisement in a local newspaper.PARTICIPANTS: 305participants with a current period of 2-4 weeks LBP and self-reported difficulty in maintaining physically demanding jobs due to LBP were interviewed, clinically examined and had an MRI at baseline.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Independent variables were high fear-avoidance, self-reported high physical demand at work and objective measures of physical workloads (JEM). Outcome was self-reported sick leave due to LBP in the previous year. Logistic regression and tests for interaction were used to identify risk factors and modifiers for the association with self-reported sick leave.RESULTS: Self-reported physically demanding work and high fear-avoidance were significantly associated with prior sick leave due to LBP in the previous year with OR 1.75 95% CI (1.10 to 2.75) and 2.75 95% CI (1.61to 4.84), respectively. No objective physical workloads had significant associations. There was no modifying effect of objective physical workloads on the association between self-reported physical demand at work/high fear-avoidance and sick leave.CONCLUSIONS: Occupational interventions to reduce sick leave due to LBP may have to focus more on those with high self-reported physical demands and high fear-avoidance, and less on individuals with the objectively highest physical workload.TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02015572; Post-results.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To investigate if self-reported high physical demand at work, objective physical workload using a job exposure matrix (JEM) and fear-avoidance beliefs are associated with reported sick leave in the previous year in persons with low back pain (LBP). Second, to investigate if the effects of fear-avoidance and self-reported high physical demand at work on sick leave are modified by the objective physical workloads.SETTINGS: Participants were recruited from general practice and by advertisement in a local newspaper.PARTICIPANTS: 305participants with a current period of 2-4 weeks LBP and self-reported difficulty in maintaining physically demanding jobs due to LBP were interviewed, clinically examined and had an MRI at baseline.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Independent variables were high fear-avoidance, self-reported high physical demand at work and objective measures of physical workloads (JEM). Outcome was self-reported sick leave due to LBP in the previous year. Logistic regression and tests for interaction were used to identify risk factors and modifiers for the association with self-reported sick leave.RESULTS: Self-reported physically demanding work and high fear-avoidance were significantly associated with prior sick leave due to LBP in the previous year with OR 1.75 95% CI (1.10 to 2.75) and 2.75 95% CI (1.61to 4.84), respectively. No objective physical workloads had significant associations. There was no modifying effect of objective physical workloads on the association between self-reported physical demand at work/high fear-avoidance and sick leave.CONCLUSIONS: Occupational interventions to reduce sick leave due to LBP may have to focus more on those with high self-reported physical demands and high fear-avoidance, and less on individuals with the objectively highest physical workload.TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02015572; Post-results.

U2 - 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-026917

DO - 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-026917

M3 - Journal article

VL - 9

SP - e026917

JO - BMJ Paediatrics Open

JF - BMJ Paediatrics Open

SN - 2044-6055

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 57539367