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Persons with type 1 diabetes have low blood oxygen levels in the supine and standing body positions

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INTRODUCTION: Blood oxygen saturation is low compared with healthy controls (CONs) in the supine body position in individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and has been associated with complications. Since most of daily life occurs in the upright position, it is of interest if this also applies in the standing body position. In addition, tissue oxygenation in other anatomical sites could show different patterns in T1D. Therefore, we investigated blood, arm and forehead oxygen levels in the supine and standing body positions in individuals with T1D (n=129) and CONs (n=55).

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Blood oxygen saturation was measured with pulse oximetry. Arm and forehead mixed tissue oxygen levels were measured with near-infrared spectroscopy sensors applied on the skin.

RESULTS: Data are presented as least squares means±SEM and differences (95% CIs). Overall blood oxygen saturation was lower in T1D (CON: 97.6%±0.2%; T1D: 97.0%±0.1%; difference: -0.5% (95% CI -0.9% to -0.0%); p=0.034). In all participants, blood oxygen saturation increased after standing up (supine: 97.1%±0.1%; standing: 97.6%±0.2%; difference: +0.6% (95% CI 0.4% to 0.8%); p<0.001). However, the increase was smaller in T1D compared with CON (CON supine: 97.3%±0.2%; CON standing: 98.0%±0.2%; T1D supine: 96.9%±0.2%; T1D standing: 97.2%±0.1%; difference between groups in the change: -0.4% (95% CI -0.6% to -0.2%); p<0.001). Arm oxygen saturation decreased in both groups after standing and more in those with T1D. Forehead oxygen saturation decreased in both groups after standing and there were no differences between the changes when comparing the groups.

CONCLUSION: Compared with CON, individuals with T1D exhibit possible detrimental patterns of tissue oxygen adaptation to standing, with preserved adaptation of forehead oxygenation. Further studies are needed to explore the consequences of these differences.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummere001944
TidsskriftBMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care
Vol/bind9
Udgave nummer1
ISSN2052-4897
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 31 maj 2021

Bibliografisk note

Funding Information:
Funding The authors acknowledge the support from the Novo Nordisk Foundation (grant number NNFOC0013659): PROTON: Personalizing Treatment of Diabetic Nephropathy. Internal funding was provided by Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen. Competing interests PR has received honoraria to Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen for consultancy from AstraZeneca, Astellas, Bayer, Boehringer Ingelheim, Gilead, Novo Nordisk, Merck, Mundipharma, Sanofi, Vifor, and research support from Astra Zeneca and Novo Nordisk. P-HG has received lecture honoraria from Astellas, AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, Eli Lilly, Elo Water, Genzyme, Medscape, MSD, Mundipharma, Novartis, Novo Nordisk, PeerVoice, Sanofi and Sciarc, and is an advisory board member of AbbVie, Astellas, AstraZeneca, Bayer, Boehringer Ingelheim, Eli Lilly, Medscape, MSD, Mundipharma, Novo Nordisk and Sanofi.

Funding Information:
The authors acknowledge the support from the Novo Nordisk Foundation (grant number NNFOC0013659): PROTON: Personalizing Treatment of Diabetic Nephropathy. Internal funding was provided by Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen.

Publisher Copyright:
© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2021. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

Copyright:
Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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